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Biochemical Genetics

, Volume 52, Issue 5–6, pp 269–282 | Cite as

Association Between Haptoglobin 2-2 Genotype and Coronary Artery Disease and Its Severity in a Tunisian Population

  • Amira Moussa
  • Jihène Rejeb
  • Asma Omezzine
  • Lamia Rebhi
  • Imen Boumaiza
  • Slim Kacem
  • Nabila Ben Rejeb
  • Essia Boughzala
  • Ahmed Ben Abdelaziz
  • Ali Bouslama
Article

Abstract

Haptoglobin (Hp) polymorphism generates three common human genotypes (Hp1-1, Hp2-1, and Hp2-2), having functional differences, related to the risk of development of cardiovascular diseases. These functions are a consequence of hemoglobin binding that leads to the synthesis of an antioxidant like ferritin. We explored the association of Hp polymorphism with significant coronary stenosis (SCS) and its severity within 400 Tunisian patients, using genotyping, biochemical parameters, and the Gensini score. After adjustments for age and gender, Hp2-2 was associated with the highest ferritin but the lowest Hp concentrations. After adjustments for confounding parameters, the OR of SCS associated with Hp2-2 was 1.74 (95% CI 1.18–2.58; p = 0.005). This effect was enhanced within diabetics (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.11–3.24; p = 0.018), obese subjects (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.10–4.86; p = 0.034), and smokers (OR 4.17, 95% CI 1.54–1.29; p = 0.005). The Hp2-2 genotype is associated with an increase in SCS especially in diabetics, the obese, and smokers.

Keywords

Haptoglobin Coronary artery disease Hp2-2 genotype Tunisia 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to Mrs. Elise Fletcher Nouira, EFL teacher, for her contribution in checking the manuscript language, and Mr. Chaabani H and Mrs. Haj Khellil A. We acknowledge the general director of Sahloul University Hospital and the excellent technical assistance of members of the Biochemistry Department of Sahloul University Hospital. We are especially grateful to the study participants. This study was funded by grants from the Tunisian Ministry of Higher Education, Scientific Research and Technology and the Tunisian Ministry of Health (LR 12 SP11); without their immense generosity and support, this study could not have been undertaken.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amira Moussa
    • 1
  • Jihène Rejeb
    • 1
  • Asma Omezzine
    • 1
  • Lamia Rebhi
    • 1
  • Imen Boumaiza
    • 1
  • Slim Kacem
    • 2
  • Nabila Ben Rejeb
    • 1
  • Essia Boughzala
    • 2
  • Ahmed Ben Abdelaziz
    • 3
  • Ali Bouslama
    • 1
  1. 1.Biochemistry Department, LR 12 SP11Sahloul University HospitalSousseTunisia
  2. 2.Cardiology DepartmentSahloul University HospitalSousseTunisia
  3. 3.Information System DirectionSahloul University HospitalSousseTunisia

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