Biochemical Genetics

, Volume 47, Issue 1–2, pp 8–18

Relationships Among Genetic Makeup, Active Ingredient Content, and Place of Origin of the Medicinal Plant Gastrodia Tuber

  • Jun Tao
  • Zhi-yong Luo
  • Chikira Ismail Msangi
  • Xiao-shun Shu
  • Li Wen
  • Shui-ping Liu
  • Chang-quan Zhou
  • Rui-xin Liu
  • Wei-xin Hu
Article

Abstract

Gastrodia tuber and its component gastrodin have many pharmacological effects. The chemical fingerprints and gastrodin contents of eight Gastrodia populations were determined, and the genomic DNA polymorphism of the populations was investigated. Genetic distance coefficients among the populations were calculated using the DNA polymorphism data. A dendrogram of the genetic similarities between the populations was constructed using the genetic distance coefficients. The results indicated that the genomic DNA of Gastrodia tubers was highly polymorphic; the eight populations clustered into three major groups, and the gastrodin content varied greatly among these groups. There were obvious correlations among genetic makeup, gastrodin content, and place of origin. The ecological environments in Guizhou and Shanxi may be conducive to evolution and to gastrodin biosynthesis, and more suitable for cultivation of Gastrodia tubers. These findings may provide a scientific basis for overall genetic resource management and for the selection of locations for cultivating Gastrodia tubers.

Keywords

DNA polymorphism Gastrodia elata Blume Gastrodin Genetic relationships Chemical fingerprints 

Supplementary material

10528_2008_9201_MOESM1_ESM.doc (778 kb)
MOESM1 Genomic DNA amplification products from eight Gastrodia tuber samples, using (A) primer 6; (B) primer 10; (C) primer 12; (D) primer 14; and (E) primer 15. (DOC 777 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Tao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhi-yong Luo
    • 2
  • Chikira Ismail Msangi
    • 2
  • Xiao-shun Shu
    • 1
  • Li Wen
    • 1
  • Shui-ping Liu
    • 2
  • Chang-quan Zhou
    • 3
  • Rui-xin Liu
    • 1
  • Wei-xin Hu
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Biology and Food EngineeringChangsha University of Science and TechnologyChangshaP.R. China
  2. 2.Molecular Biology Research Center, School of Biological Science and TechnologyCentral South UniversityChangshaP.R. China
  3. 3.Hunan De-hai Corporation for PharmacyChangdeP.R. China

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