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BioControl

, Volume 59, Issue 4, pp 461–471 | Cite as

Predicting the altitudinal distribution of an introduced phytophagous insect against an invasive alien plant from laboratory controlled experiments: case of Cibdela janthina (Hymenoptera:Argidae) and Rubus alceifolius (Rosaceae) in La Réunion

  • Alexandre Mathieu
  • Yves Dumont
  • Frédéric Chiroleu
  • Pierre-François Duyck
  • Olivier Flores
  • Gérard Lebreton
  • Bernard Reynaud
  • Serge Quilici
Original Paper

Abstract

The sawfly Cibdela janthina (Hymenoptera: Argidae) native to Sumatra was introduced on La Réunion (France, Indian Ocean) in 2007 to control the giant bramble Rubus alceifolius (Rosaceae), one of the most invasive plants on this island. We determined the influence of temperature on the development duration and survival of C. janthina preimaginal stages in controlled conditions in order to parameterize a survival model and to relate the predicted survival with observed patterns of defoliation of the host plant at different altitudes. We adjusted the Régnière model to survival data, combined with the Lactin-2 model on development rate of the three preimaginal stages of C. janthina. This model adequately predicts the observed defoliation and the altitudinal limit of the biological control agent. Our results also show that studies on temperature-related constraints on the biology of an agent introduced for weed control should be emphasized both in the pre-release and the post-release phases of a biological control program to evaluate the potential success of the control programme.

Keywords

Biological control Invasive plant Sawfly Temperature-related development Altitude Distribution area 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank S. Glénac for maintaining Rubus alceifolius cultures. We are grateful to John Scott and two anonymous reviewers for helpful comments that improved the manuscript. This work was funded by CIRAD and the Direction de l’Environnement, de l’Aménagement et du Logement de La Réunion

Supplementary material

10526_2014_9574_MOESM1_ESM.doc (126 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 125 kb)

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Copyright information

© International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC) 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandre Mathieu
    • 1
  • Yves Dumont
    • 2
  • Frédéric Chiroleu
    • 1
  • Pierre-François Duyck
    • 1
  • Olivier Flores
    • 1
  • Gérard Lebreton
    • 1
  • Bernard Reynaud
    • 1
  • Serge Quilici
    • 1
  1. 1.CIRAD Pôle de Protection des PlantesUMR C53 PVBMT CIRAD-Université de la RéunionSaint PierreFrance
  2. 2.CIRADUMR AMAP, TA A51/PS2Montpellier Cedex 5France

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