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Biogerontology

, Volume 12, Issue 5, pp 451–454 | Cite as

Reduced plasma levels of P-selectin and L-selectin in a pilot study from Alzheimer disease: relationship with neuro-degeneration

  • Massimiliano M. CorsiEmail author
  • Federico Licastro
  • Elisa Porcellini
  • Giada Dogliotti
  • Emanuela Galliera
  • John L. Lamont
  • Paul J. Innocenzi
  • Stephen P. Fitzgerald
Research Article

Abstract

Neurodegenerative processes associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are accompanied by reactive astrogliosis and microglia activation and a role for chronic inflammation in the brain degeneration of these patients has been suggested. Moreover impaired immune functions in AD brains might also influence the disease’s progression. Therefore, it is of interest to further characterized inflammatory molecules in the peripheral blood of patients with AD and its relationship with cognitive decline. A complex picture emerged in this pilot study and IL-8, IFN-gamma, MCP-1 and VEGF levels were increased in AD. Levels of P-selectin and L-selectin were decreased in AD and lowest in AD patients with highest cognitive decline. Our findings suggest that these molecules may induce alterations of endothelial regulation and influence neurodegenerative processes of AD.

Keywords

P-selectin L-selectin Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis and prognosis Slow cognitive decline Fast cognitive decline 

Notes

Conflict of interest

None to be declared.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massimiliano M. Corsi
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Federico Licastro
    • 3
  • Elisa Porcellini
    • 3
  • Giada Dogliotti
    • 1
  • Emanuela Galliera
    • 1
  • John L. Lamont
    • 4
  • Paul J. Innocenzi
    • 4
  • Stephen P. Fitzgerald
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Human Morphology and Biomedical Sciences “Città Studi”, Clinical Pathology Unit, Medical FacultyUniversity of MilanMilanItaly
  2. 2.IRCCS Policlinico San DonatoSan DonatoItaly
  3. 3.Department of Experimental Pathology, Immunology Unit, Medical FacultyUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly
  4. 4.Randox LaboratoriesCrumlinNorthern Ireland, UK

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