Biogerontology

, Volume 11, Issue 5, pp 537–545

Moving against frailty: does physical activity matter?

  • Francesco Landi
  • Angela M. Abbatecola
  • Mauro Provinciali
  • Andrea Corsonello
  • Silvia Bustacchini
  • Luca Manigrasso
  • Antonio Cherubini
  • Roberto Bernabei
  • Fabrizia Lattanzio
SI: Frailty, Ageing and Inflammation

DOI: 10.1007/s10522-010-9296-1

Cite this article as:
Landi, F., Abbatecola, A.M., Provinciali, M. et al. Biogerontology (2010) 11: 537. doi:10.1007/s10522-010-9296-1

Abstract

Frailty is a common condition in older persons and has been described as a geriatric syndrome resulting from age-related cumulative declines across multiple physiologic systems, with impaired homeostatic reserve and a reduced capacity of the organism to resist stress. Therefore, frailty is considered as a state of high vulnerability for adverse health outcomes, such as disability, falls, hospitalization, institutionalization, and mortality. Regular physical activity has been shown to protect against diverse components of the frailty syndrome in men and women of all ages and frailty is not a contra-indication to physical activity, rather it may be one of the most important reasons to prescribe physical exercise. It has been recognized that physical activity can have an impact on different components of the frailty syndrome. This review will address the role of physical activity on the most relevant components of frailty syndrome, with specific reference to: (i) sarcopenia, as a condition which frequently overlaps with frailty; (ii) functional impairment, considering the role of physical inactivity as one of the strongest predictors of physical disability in elders; (iii) cognitive performance, including evidence on how exercise and physical activity decrease the risk of early cognitive decline and poor cognition in late life; and (iv) depression by reviewing the effect of exercise on improving mood and increasing positive well-being.

Keywords

Physical activity Frailty Elderly 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesco Landi
    • 1
  • Angela M. Abbatecola
    • 2
  • Mauro Provinciali
    • 3
  • Andrea Corsonello
    • 4
  • Silvia Bustacchini
    • 2
  • Luca Manigrasso
    • 5
  • Antonio Cherubini
    • 6
  • Roberto Bernabei
    • 1
  • Fabrizia Lattanzio
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Gerontology and GeriatricsCatholic University of Sacred HeartRomeItaly
  2. 2.Scientific DirectionItalian National Research Center on Aging (INRCA)AnconaItaly
  3. 3.Immunology Centre, Gerontology Research DepartmentItalian National Research Center on Aging (INRCA)AnconaItaly
  4. 4.Unit of Geriatric Pharmacoepidemiology, Research Hospital of CosenzaItalian National Research Center on Aging (INRCA)CosenzaItaly
  5. 5.Unit of Geriatric Emergency Care, Research Hospital of AnconaItalian National Research Center on Aging (INRCA)AnconaItaly
  6. 6.Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Institute of Gerontology and GeriatricsUniversity of PerugiaPerugiaItaly

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