Behavior Genetics

, Volume 43, Issue 5, pp 386–401

Genetic and Neurophysiological Correlates of the Age of Onset of Alcohol Use Disorders in Adolescents and Young Adults

  • David B. Chorlian
  • Madhavi Rangaswamy
  • Niklas Manz
  • Jen-Chyong Wang
  • Danielle Dick
  • Laura Almasy
  • Lance Bauer
  • Kathleen Bucholz
  • Tatiana Foroud
  • Victor Hesselbrock
  • Sun J. Kang
  • John Kramer
  • Sam Kuperman
  • John NurnbergerJr.
  • John Rice
  • Marc Schuckit
  • Jay Tischfield
  • Howard J. Edenberg
  • Alison Goate
  • Laura Bierut
  • Bernice Porjesz
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s10519-013-9604-z

Cite this article as:
Chorlian, D.B., Rangaswamy, M., Manz, N. et al. Behav Genet (2013) 43: 386. doi:10.1007/s10519-013-9604-z

Abstract

Discrete time survival analysis was used to assess the age-specific association of event-related oscillations (EROs) and CHRM2 gene variants on the onset of regular alcohol use and alcohol dependence. The subjects were 2,938 adolescents and young adults ages 12–25. Results showed that the CHRM2 gene variants and ERO risk factors had hazards which varied considerably with age. The bulk of the significant age-specific associations occurred in those whose age of onset was under 16. These associations were concentrated in those subjects who at some time took an illicit drug. These results are consistent with studies which associate greater rates of alcohol dependence among those who begin drinking at an early age. The age specificity of the genetic and neurophysiological factors is consistent with recent studies of adolescent brain development, which locate an interval of heightened vulnerability to substance use disorders in the early to mid teens.

Keywords

Alcoholism CHRM2 Survival analysis ERO Genetics Adolescents 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • David B. Chorlian
    • 1
  • Madhavi Rangaswamy
    • 1
  • Niklas Manz
    • 1
  • Jen-Chyong Wang
    • 2
  • Danielle Dick
    • 3
  • Laura Almasy
    • 4
  • Lance Bauer
    • 5
  • Kathleen Bucholz
    • 2
  • Tatiana Foroud
    • 6
  • Victor Hesselbrock
    • 5
  • Sun J. Kang
    • 1
  • John Kramer
    • 7
  • Sam Kuperman
    • 7
  • John NurnbergerJr.
    • 8
  • John Rice
    • 2
  • Marc Schuckit
    • 9
  • Jay Tischfield
    • 10
  • Howard J. Edenberg
    • 11
  • Alison Goate
    • 2
  • Laura Bierut
    • 2
  • Bernice Porjesz
    • 1
  1. 1.Henri Begleiter Neurodynamics Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesSUNY Downstate Medical CenterBrooklynUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryWashington University School of MedicineSaint LouisUSA
  3. 3.Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral GeneticsVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  4. 4.Department of GeneticsTexas Biomedical Research InstituteSan AntonioUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Connecticut Health CenterFarmingtonUSA
  6. 6.Department of Medical and Molecular GeneticsIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA
  7. 7.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Iowa College of MedicineIowa CityUSA
  8. 8.Department of PsychiatryIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA
  9. 9.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California-San DiegoLa JollaUSA
  10. 10.Department of GeneticsRutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA
  11. 11.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA

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