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Bulletin of Earthquake Engineering

, Volume 8, Issue 5, pp 1175–1187 | Cite as

The ITalian ACcelerometric Archive (ITACA): processing of strong-motion data

  • Marco MassaEmail author
  • Francesca Pacor
  • Lucia Luzi
  • Dino Bindi
  • Giuliano Milana
  • Fabio Sabetta
  • Antonella Gorini
  • Sandro Marcucci
Original Research Paper

Abstract

The Italian strong-motion database was created during a joint project between Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV, Italian Institute for Geophysics and Vulcanology) and Dipartimento della Protezione Civile (DPC, Italian Civil Protection). The aim of the project was the collection, homogenization and distribution of strong motion data acquired in Italy in the period 1972–2004 by different institutions, namely Ente Nazionale per l’Energia Elettrica (ENEL, Italian electricity company), Ente per le Nuove tecnologie, l’Energia e l’Ambiente (ENEA, Italian energy and environment organization) and DPC. Recently the strong-motion data relative to the 23th December 2009, Parma (Mw = 5.4 and Mw = 4.9) and to the April 2009 L’Aquila sequences (13 earthquakes with 4.1 ≤ Mw ≤ 6.3) were included in the Italian Accelerometric Archive (ITACA) database (beta release). The database contains 7,038 waveforms from analog and digital instruments, generated by 1.019 earthquakes with magnitude up to 6.9 and can be accessed on-line at the web site http://itaca.mi.ingv.it. The strong motion data are provided in the unprocessed and processed versions. This article describes the steps followed to process the acceleration time series recorded by analogue and digital instruments. The procedures implemented involve: baseline removal, instrumental correction, band pass filtering with acausal filters, integration of the corrected acceleration in order to obtain velocity and displacement waveforms, computation of acceleration response spectra and strong motion parameters. This procedure is applied to each accelerogram and it is realised to preserve the low frequency content of the records.

Keywords

Strong-motion data Data processing Filtering Strong-motion parameters 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marco Massa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Francesca Pacor
    • 1
  • Lucia Luzi
    • 1
  • Dino Bindi
    • 1
  • Giuliano Milana
    • 2
  • Fabio Sabetta
    • 3
  • Antonella Gorini
    • 3
  • Sandro Marcucci
    • 3
  1. 1.INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia)MilanoItaly
  2. 2.INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia)RomaItaly
  3. 3.Dipartimento della Protezione CivileRomaItaly

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