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Quantitative Changes in the Population of Cancer Stem Cells after Radiation Exposure in a Dose of 10 Gy as a Prognostic Marker of Immediate Results of the Treatment of Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer

  • I. A. ZamulaevaEmail author
  • E. I. Selivanova
  • O. N. Matchuk
  • L. I. Krikunova
  • L. S. Mkrtchyan
  • G. Z. Kulieva
  • A. D. Kaprin
Article

Prognostic significance of the proportion of cancer stem cells in cervical scrapings from 38 patients with uterine cervical cancer before treatment and after irradiation in a total dose of 10 Gy was assessed for immediate results of radio- and combined chemoradiotherapy evaluated by the degree of tumor regression in 3-6 months after the treatment. Cancer stem cells were detected as cells with CD44+CD24low immunophenotype by flow cytometry. The proportion of cancer stem cells in patients with the complete tumor regression decreased by on average 2.2±1.1% after irradiation, while in patients with partial regression this indicator increased by on average 3.3±2.3% (p=0.03). Multiple regression analysis revealed two independent indicators affecting tumor regression: the stage of the disease (which is quite expected) and change in the proportion of cancer stem cells after the first irradiation sessions (R=0.60, p<0.002 for the model in the whole). The proportion of cancer stem cells before the treatment did not have prognostic significance.

Key Words

cancer stem cells cervical cancer radiotherapy prognosis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. A. Zamulaeva
    • 1
    Email author
  • E. I. Selivanova
    • 1
  • O. N. Matchuk
    • 1
  • L. I. Krikunova
    • 1
  • L. S. Mkrtchyan
    • 1
  • G. Z. Kulieva
    • 1
  • A. D. Kaprin
    • 1
  1. 1.A. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Center, Affiliated Branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Center, Ministry of Health of the Russian FederationObninskRussia

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