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Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 147, Issue 2, pp 204–207 | Cite as

Antithrombogenic and Antiplatelet Activities of Extract from Maackia amyrensis Wood

  • A. M. PlotnikovaEmail author
  • Z. T. Shulgau
  • T. M. Plotnikova
  • O. I. Aliev
  • N. I. Kulesh
  • N. P. Mischenko
  • S. A. Fedoreyev
Pharmacology and Toxicology

Antithrombogenic and antiplatelet effects of a new drug, containing isoflavonoids (extract from the wood of Maackia amyrensis, a Far Eastern plant), were studied. A course (200 mg/kg intragastrically during 14 days) of Maackia amyrensis extract prevented intravascular clotting, initiated by application of 10% iron chloride solution on the vessel. The drug increased antiaggregant activity of the vascular wall and potentiated endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in ovariectomied rats. The reference drug ethinylestradiol (25 μg/kg intragastrically during 14 days) potentiated the antiaggregant effect of the endothelium, but was inferior to Maackia amyrensis extract in the capacity to induce endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in ovariectomied rats.

Key Words

thrombosis ovariectomy isoflavonoids Maackia amyrensis extract ethinylestradiol 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Plotnikova
    • 1
    Email author
  • Z. T. Shulgau
    • 2
  • T. M. Plotnikova
    • 2
  • O. I. Aliev
    • 1
  • N. I. Kulesh
    • 3
  • N. P. Mischenko
    • 3
  • S. A. Fedoreyev
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Pharmacology, Tomsk Research CenterSiberian Division of the Russian Academy of Medical SciencesTomskRussia
  2. 2.Siberian State Medical UniversityTomskRussia
  3. 3.Pacific Institute of Organic BiochemistryFar Eastern Division of the Russian Academy of SciencesVladivostokRussia

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