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Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 141, Issue 1, pp 117–120 | Cite as

Characteristics of bone marrow cells under conditions of impaired innervation in patients with spinal trauma

  • E. R. Chernykh
  • E. Ya. Shevela
  • O. Yu. Leplina
  • M. A. Tikhonova
  • A. A. Ostanin
  • A. D. Kulagin
  • N. V. Pronkina
  • Zh. M. Muradov
  • V. V. Stupak
  • V. A. Kozlov
Translated from Kletochnye Tekhnologii v Biologii i Meditsine (Cell Technologies in Biology and Medicine)

Abstract

We studied quantitative and functional parameters of bone marrow stem cells and mature lymphocyte population under conditions of impaired innervation in patients with injuries to the cervical and thoracic portions of the spinal cord. Our findings indicated the absence of deficiency of quantitative and proliferative potentials of stem cells and demonstrated intact subpopulation structure of mature lymphocytes and T-cell proliferative activity similar to that in donors. The content of CD34+ cells in patients did not differ from that in donors. The percentage of CD34+CD38 hemopoietic stem cells was elevated in patients, presumably due to increased proliferative activity of hemopoietic stem cells. The possibility of derivation and in vitro culturing of fibroblast-like cells with mesenchymal stem cell phenotype was demonstrated.

Key Words

bone marrow stem cells spinal injury 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. R. Chernykh
    • 1
  • E. Ya. Shevela
    • 1
  • O. Yu. Leplina
    • 1
  • M. A. Tikhonova
    • 1
  • A. A. Ostanin
    • 1
  • A. D. Kulagin
    • 1
  • N. V. Pronkina
    • 1
  • Zh. M. Muradov
    • 2
  • V. V. Stupak
    • 2
  • V. A. Kozlov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Clinical ImmunologySiberian Division of Russian Academy of Medical SciencesRussia
  2. 2.Institute of Traumatology and OrthopedicsMinistry of Health of the Russian FederationNovosibirsk

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