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Axiomathes

pp 1–15 | Cite as

The Weak Objectivity of Mathematics and Its Reasonable Effectiveness in Science

  • Daniele MolininiEmail author
Original Paper
  • 32 Downloads

Abstract

Philosophical analysis of mathematical knowledge are commonly conducted within the realist/antirealist dichotomy. Nevertheless, philosophers working within this dichotomy pay little attention to the way in which mathematics evolves and structures itself. Focusing on mathematical practice, I propose a weak notion of objectivity of mathematical knowledge that preserves the intersubjective character of mathematical knowledge but does not bear on a view of mathematics as a body of mind-independent necessary truths. Furthermore, I show how that the successful application of mathematics in science is an important trigger for the objectivity of mathematical knowledge.

Keywords

Mathematical knowledge Objectivity Platonism Nominalism Applicability of mathematics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank one anonymous reviewer for helpful comments. This work was supported by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology through the FCT Investigator Programme (Grant Nr. IF/01354/2015).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The author reports no real or perceived vested interests that relate to this article that could be construed as a conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculdade de CiênciasUniversidade de LisboaLisbonPortugal

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