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Autonomous Robots

, Volume 43, Issue 5, pp 1101–1115 | Cite as

A regrasp planning component for object reorientation

  • Weiwei WanEmail author
  • Hisashi Igawa
  • Kensuke Harada
  • Hiromu Onda
  • Kazuyuki Nagata
  • Natsuki Yamanobe
Article

Abstract

This paper presents a regrasp planning component for object reorientation. It includes a grasp planner, a placement planner, and a regrasp sequence solver. Given the initial and goal poses of an object, the regrasp planning component finds a sequence of robot postures and grasp configurations that reorient the object from the initial pose to the goal. The regrasp planning component works as a mid-level connector in the whole planning system for object reorientation. It is open to low-level motion planning algorithms by providing two end-effector poses as the input. It is also open to high-level assembly or symbolic planners by providing pick-and-place predicates. The proposed component is demonstrated with several simulation examples and real-robot executions using a Kawada Hiro robot and Robotiq 85 grippers.

Keywords

Grasp planning Manipulation planning Object reorientation 

Notes

Supplementary material

Supplementary material 1 (mp4 28087 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Intelligent System Research Institute/Artificial Intelligence Research CenterNational Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)TokyoJapan
  2. 2.School/Graduate School of Engineering ScienceOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan
  3. 3.Industrial Research InstituteHokkaido Research OrganizationSapporoJapan

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