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Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 48, Issue 4, pp 1185–1190 | Cite as

Risk Perception and Interest in HIV Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men with Rectal Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Infection

  • Katie B. Biello
  • Alberto Edeza
  • Madeline C. Montgomery
  • Alexi Almonte
  • Philip A. ChanEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Rectal gonorrhea and chlamydia infections are associated with significantly increased risk of HIV transmission among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM diagnosed with rectal gonorrhea or chlamydia may benefit from pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention. We analyzed HIV risk perception, PrEP interest, and sexually transmitted infection (STI) test results among MSM presenting to a publicly funded STI clinic from 2014 to 2016. A total of 401 MSM were tested for rectal STIs during the study period: 18% were diagnosed with rectal gonorrhea or chlamydia infection. Patients who perceived themselves to be at medium or high risk for HIV were significantly more likely to express interest in PrEP compared to those who reported low or no perceived risk (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.13–3.11; p = .014). However, there was no significant difference in perceived HIV risk between those who were diagnosed with a rectal STI and those who were not. Although rectal STIs are a significant risk factor for HIV infection, MSM diagnosed with a rectal STI did not perceive themselves to be at increased risk for HIV infection, indicating a potential barrier to successful PrEP implementation in this population.

Keywords

Sexually transmitted infection PrEP Extragenital MSM 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Behavioral and Social SciencesBrown University School of Public HealthProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Department of EpidemiologyBrown University School of Public HealthProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.Center for Health Equity ResearchBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  4. 4.The Fenway InstituteFenway HealthBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of MedicineBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  6. 6.Division of Infectious DiseasesThe Miriam HospitalProvidenceUSA

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