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Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 45, Issue 3, pp 761–765 | Cite as

Neural Correlates of Psychosis and Gender Dysphoria in an Adult Male

  • Karine SchwarzEmail author
  • Anna Martha Vaitses Fontanari
  • Andressa Mueller
  • Bianca Soll
  • Dhiordan Cardoso da Silva
  • Jaqueline Salvador
  • Kenneth J. Zucker
  • Maiko Abel Schneider
  • Maria Inês Rodrigues Lobato
Clinical Case Report Series

Abstract

Gender dysphoria (GD) (DSM-5) or transsexualism (ICD-10) refers to the marked incongruity between the experience of one’s gender and the sex at birth. In this case report, we describe the use of LSD as a triggering factor of confusion in the gender identity of a 39-year-old male patient, with symptoms of psychosis and 25 years of substance abuse, who sought psychiatric care with the desire to undergo sex reassignment surgery. The symptoms of GD/psychosis were resolved by two therapeutic measures: withdrawal of psychoactive substances and use of a low-dose antipsychotic. We discuss the hypothesis that the superior parietal cortical area may be an important locus for body image and that symptoms of GD may be related to variations underlying this brain region. Finally, this case report shows that some presentations of GD can be created by life experience in individuals who have underlying mental or, synonymously, neurophysiological abnormalities.

Keywords

Gender identity Transsexualism Lysergic acid diethylamide Parietal lobe Psychotic disorders DSM-5 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karine Schwarz
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Anna Martha Vaitses Fontanari
    • 2
  • Andressa Mueller
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bianca Soll
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dhiordan Cardoso da Silva
    • 2
  • Jaqueline Salvador
    • 2
  • Kenneth J. Zucker
    • 3
  • Maiko Abel Schneider
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maria Inês Rodrigues Lobato
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Graduate Program in Medical Sciences: PsychiatryUniversidade Federal do Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  2. 2.Gender Identity Disorder Program, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA)Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  3. 3.Gender Identity Clinic, Child, Youth, and Family ServicesCentre for Addiction and Mental HealthTorontoCanada

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