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Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 41, Issue 1, pp 1–4 | Cite as

Late-Onset Growing Pains

  • Kenneth J. Zucker
Editorial
As the Archives inches into its fifth decade, it is experiencing some late-onset growing pains. Since I became Editor in 2002, the number of new submissions has risen dramatically (Fig. 1). It began to dawn on me that it was becoming increasingly difficult to keep up with the flow. As I noted last year (Zucker, 2011), I was delighted to appoint five Associate Editors (Lori A. Brotto, Michael P. Carey, Shari L. Dworkin, Marta Meana, and Jeffrey T. Parsons) to assist in the reviewing process. Subsequently, we have added three scholars to the Editorial Board and 25 scholars as Consulting Editors to help us in providing quality peer review: Lisa M. DeBruine, Benedict C. Jones, Carol Lynn Martin, Drew H. Bailey, Andrea Bradford, Carol S. Camlin, Megan S. Dunbar, Rutger C. M. E. Engels, Robyn L. Fielder, Maryanne L. Fisher, Sabina Hirshfield, Roland Imhoff, Kari Lerum, Matthew J. Mimiaga, Angulique Y. Outlaw, Jesse J. Owen, Thomas L. Patterson, Martin Plöderl, Elke D. Reissing, Gerulf Rieger, Stephen T. Russell, Eric W. Schrimshaw, Lori J. Scott-Sheldon, Brooke N. Seal, Theresa E. Senn, Kelly B. Smith, Ana Ventuneac, and Patrick A. Wilson. We now have two father–son pairs on the Board (Bailey and Bailey and Dixson and Dixson): it is unclear if the transmission is genetic or psychosocial. With more submissions, that means that more articles make their way into print. To avoid overweight issues, in 2013 the Journal will publish eight times/year instead of six (C. Bischoff, personal communication, August 24, 2011).
Fig. 1

Number of submissions (2002–2011)

The Impact Factor (IF)

Calculated each year by the Web of Science® (Thomson Reuters), a journal’s IF for a given year is a measure of the frequency with which its recent articles are cited on average during that year. “Recent” refers to the two prior calendar years. Thus, Archives’ 2010 IF is the number of times that its 2008 and 2009 articles were cited in 2010, divided by the number of articles the Archives published in 2008 and 2009. Although the IF is the best known metric for citation analysis, there are other measures, including the immediacy index (II) and the cited half-life (CHL). The II is a measure of how frequently the journal’s “average article” is cited the same year in which it is published. Thus, the II for a year is calculated as the number of times articles from that journal are cited during that year, divided by the number of articles that journal published that year. The CHL is a measure of the longevity of the frequency of citations to articles in the journal, that is, for how long the average article maintains its currency. The CHL for a year is determined by the time required to account for a cumulative total of 50% of that year’s citations to the journal.

Table 1 shows the IF of the sex and gender periodicals, broadly defined, for the year 2010. The IF of Archives had a nice jump from 3.23 in 2009 to 3.66 in 2010. The meaning of the IF can be crudely gauged in comparative perspective: for 2010, of 2,678 Social Science journals, Archives was ranked 93rd (96th percentile). Of 102 journals classified as Psychology (Clinical), Archives was ranked 9th (91st percentile). Of 83 journals classified as Social Science, Interdisciplinary, Archives was ranked 1st. For the first time, Archives surpassed Evolution and Human Behavior by a staggering .014 points (3.660 vs. 3.646). We also closed the gap to .33 to Hormones and Behavior and to .29 to Journal of Sexual Medicine. Perhaps 2011 will bring another great leap forward.1
Table 1

Impact factor for the year 2010: Sex- and gender-related journals (N = 67)

Journal

Impact factor

2010 total cites

2010 articles

Immediacy index

Cited half-life

Archives of Sexual Behavior

3.660

3,126

114

1.044

7.0

AIDS

6.348

21,706

395

1.327

6.0

Psychoneuroendocrinology

5.168

7,612

171

0.947

5.8

AIDS Reviews

4.786

661

20

0.200

4.2

Human Reproduction

4.357

25,468

368

0.804

7.7

Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes

4.262

11,857

305

1.046

5.4

Hormones and Behavior

3.991

6,833

170

0.706

6.2

Journal of Sexual Medicine

3.957

4,843

382

0.772

2.5

Evolution and Human Behavior

3.646

1,997

50

0.600

6.1

International Journal of Andrology

3.601

2,488

93

0.699

5.5

Menopause

3.318

3,161

138

1.043

3.9

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

3.268

5,308

133

0.594

5.9

AIDS and Behavior

3.195

2,392

170

0.729

3.7

Fertility and Sterility

3.122

25,664

844

0.716

6.9

Sexual Development

3.052

319

43

0.581

2.6

Sexually Transmitted Infections

3.029

3,928

165

1.327

5.0

International Journal of Impotence Research

2.415

2,269

50

0.360

6.7

Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy

2.364

1,500

27

0.333

9.1

AIDS Patient Care and STDs

2.333

1,782

89

0.326

4.2

Psychology of Men and Masculinity

2.208

580

25

0.28

5.5

Body Image

2.109

841

57

0.298

4.5

Politics and Gender

2.107

242

19

0.158

4.1

Gender and Society

2.088

1,749

30

0.300

10.0

Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

2.075

913

38

0.289

5.8

Hormone Researcha

2.044

3,399

  

7.4

AIDS Care

1.593

3,223

211

0.166

5.5

Asian Journal of Andrology

1.549

1,194

98

0.765

4.0

Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment

1.500

757

25

0.280

6.7

Journal of Sex Research

1.488

1,927

47

0.298

>10.0

Journal of Women’s Health

1.454

1,968

247

0.211

4.1

Psychology of Women Quarterly

1.420

1,912

44

0.795

>10.0

AIDS Education and Prevention

1.361

1,347

42

0.167

7.4

Sexual Health

1.361

435

70

0.829

3.1

Women’s Health Issues

1.287

786

55

0.327

5.2

Evolutionary Psychology

1.278

218

43

0.140

3.2

Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology

1.221

811

32

0.156

7.9

Sex Roles

1.213

4,075

137

0.146

9.5

Culture, Health, and Sexuality

1.195

582

72

0.153

5.2

International Journal of STD and AIDS

1.082

2,462

191

0.236

6.1

Body and Society

1.082

469

25

0.360

7.1

Gender, Place, and Culture

1.030

499

41

0.024

7.0

Feminism and Psychology

0.922

440

35

0.229

6.8

Women and Health

0.895

1,051

47

0.106

8.7

Feminist Theory

0.857

192

19

0.000

6.0

Men and Masculinities

0.814

340

26

0.423

5.8

International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

0.806

27

36

0.056

 

Australian Feminist Studies

0.710

153

37

0.027

5.8

Sexuality and Disability

0.674

281

24

0.083

9.8

Feminist Review

0.617

336

20

0.300

>10.0

International Journal of Sexual Health

0.610

39

24

0.125

 

GLQ: A Journal of Gay and Lesbian Studies

0.588

222

24

0.000

7.2

Gender and Education

0.583

512

41

0.024

7.0

European Journal of Women’s Studies

0.579

291

19

0.158

4.6

Signs

0.554

1,155

43

0.070

>10.0

Journal of Gender Studies

0.551

151

24

0.125

6.8

differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies

0.548

168

27

0.000

8.2

Journal of Homosexuality

0.436

964

65

0.092

>10.0

Journal of Child Sexual Abuse

0.359

301

5

2.000

7.6

Women’s Studies International Forum

0.333

611

59

0.085

9.5

Journal of the History of Sexuality

0.324

144

20

0.000

9.0

Indian Journal of Gender Studies

0.263

37

17

0.059

 

Asian Journal of Women’s Studies

0.206

50

16

0.062

 

Zeitschrift für Sexual Forschung

0.152

36

17

0.000

 

Women and Therapy

0.146

182

36

0.028

9.7

Frontiers: Journal of Women’s Studies

0.119

80

24

0.000

 

Feministische Studien

0.074

20

13

0.000

 

Feminist Studies

0.071

393

28

0.000

>10.0

Total cites indicates the total number of times that each journal has been cited by all journals included in the ISI database in 2010. Immediacy index means cites in 2010 to articles published in 2010/number of articles published in 2010. Cited half-life is the median age of its articles cited in the current year. Half of the citations to the journal are to articles published within the cited half-life

aRenamed Hormone Research in Paediatrics in 2010; hence, some of the metrics in the table are not available

There is certainly evidence that articles in this journal are being read (or at least being printed out). Over the past 5 years, the number of articles downloaded were: 93,307 (2007), 141,063 (2008), 194,212 (2009), 321,801 (2010), and, for the first 11 months of 2011, 248,144. A lot of people have time on their hands.

In previous Editorials, I have observed that there are many sex and gender journals that are not given an IF by the Web of Science®. I am pleased to note in Table 1 that International Journal of Sexual Health (formerly Journal of Psychology and Human Sexuality) and the Psychology of Men and Masculinity have now joined the numbers game. I would still like to see some other periodicals, such as International Journal of Transgenderism, Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health, Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, Psychology and Sexuality, Sexologies, Sexualities, Sexuality and Culture, and Sexuality Research and Social Policy, enter the fray. In 2012, there will also be at least one new sex and gender periodical: Journal of Language and Sexuality (John Benjamins Publishing Company).

Submissions and Disposition

Figure 2 shows the Editorial decision data for the original submissions as a function of year (2002–2010). The percentage of manuscripts that were accepted or provisionally accepted ranged from 12.4 to 21.2%; the percentage of manuscripts that were subject to major revision ranged from 28.4 to 47.5%; and the percentage of manuscripts that were rejected ranged from 31.2 to 57.7%. As I noted in last year’s Editorial (Zucker, 2011), around 75% of manuscripts subject to major revision wind up being published in the Journal. The vast majority of the remainder are not resubmitted by the authors.
Fig. 2

Manuscript disposition after initial submission (2002–2010)

Transitions

After serving on the Board for 10 years, Ine Vanwesenbeeck has stepped down. It will be difficult to replace this premier scholar of sex work research. I am delighted to note that Editorial Board member Richard C. Friedman has been appointed Editor of Psychodynamic Psychiatry (formerly the Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry), Editorial Board member Kim Wallen has been appointed Editor of Hormones and Behavior, and Associate Editor Jeffrey T. Parsons has been appointed Editor of Sexuality Research and Social Policy. With the support of the Officers of the International Academy of Sex Research (Cynthia Graham, Erick Janssen, Ellen Laan, and David Moskowitz), I will begin my third 5-year term as Editor in 2012. Lastly, as 2011 came to a close, I began my first term as a grandfather, with the little one born on 28 December (birthweight, 3,090 g). Not bad for the final new submission of the year. If I can hold on, she can take over as Editor one day.

Footnotes

  1. 1.

    There are, of course, other kinds of impact factors. As reported in the January/February 2012 issue of SPIN, the post-modern world’s premiere music magazine, the album David Comes to Life by my son’s band, Fucked Up, was ranked as the top album of the year (http://www.spin.com/) (Marchese, 2012).

References

  1. Marchese, D. (2012). Fucked up: David comes to life. Album of the Year (pp. 66–69). New York: SPIN.Google Scholar
  2. Zucker, K. J. (2011). The Archives of Sexual Behavior: 40 years on [Editorial]. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 40, 1–4.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Gender Identity Service, Child, Youth, and Family ProgramCentre for Addiction and Mental HealthTorontoCanada

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