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Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 40, Issue 6, pp 1097–1098 | Cite as

Paraphilic Coercive Disorder Does Not Belong in DSM-5 for Statistical, Historical, Conceptual, and Practical Reasons

  • Richard WollertEmail author
Article

Stern (2010), an advisor to the DSM-5 Paraphilias subworkgroup, observed that the DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association, 2000) does not include a specific paraphilic diagnosis that pertains to men who prefer “raping over intimate sexual interaction.” Instead, he claimed that “this ‘distinct paraphilia’ is now being documented” in Sexually Violent Predator (SVP) civil commitment cases as “Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified (rape) or Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified (Nonconsent) or some similar terminology.”

Stern, who prosecutes SVP cases in the state of Washington, also indicated that “others have argued that the Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified diagnosis is unfair to use in these SVP cases because it is too vague or unreliable.” This argument is misguided, Stern implied, because “Packard and Levenson ( 2006)…demonstrated that psychologists’ ability to reliably diagnose paraphilias, including Paraphilia Not Otherwise Specified, is no different than the ability of mental...

Keywords

American Psychiatric Association Pedophilia Task Force Report Civil Commitment Gender Identity Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWashington State University VancouverVancouverUSA

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