Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 39, Issue 6, pp 1235–1237 | Cite as

Disregarding Science, Clinical Utility, and the DSM’s Definition of Mental Disorder: The Case of Exhibitionism, Voyeurism, and Frotteurism

Letter to the Editor

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of LinguisticsUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

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