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Archives of Sexual Behavior

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 325–345 | Cite as

The DSM Diagnostic Criteria for Sexual Sadism

  • Richard B. Krueger
Original Paper

Abstract

I reviewed the empirical literature for 1900–2008 on the paraphilia of Sexual Sadism for the Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders Workgroup for the forthcoming fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The results of this review were tabulated into a general summary of the criticisms relevant to the DSM diagnosis of Sexual Sadism, the assessment of Sexual Sadism utilizing the DSM in samples drawn from forensic populations, and the assessment of Sexual Sadism using the DSM in non-forensic populations. I conclude that the diagnosis of Sexual Sadism should be retained, that minimal modifications of the wording of this diagnosis are warranted, and that there is a need for the development of dimensional and structured diagnostic instruments.

Keywords

Paraphilias Sexual Sadism Sexual Masochism Paraphilic coercive disorder DSM-V 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This article was prepared with the assistance of Dr. Meg Kaplan. The author is a member of the DSM-V Workgroup on Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders (Chair, Kenneth J. Zucker, Ph.D.). I wish to acknowledge the valuable input I received from members of my Paraphilias subworkgroup (Ray Blanchard, Marty Kafka, and Niklas Långström) and Kenneth J. Zucker. Reprinted with permission from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders V Workgroup Reports (Copyright 2009), American Psychiatric Association.

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Copyright information

© American Psychiatric Association 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sexual Behavior ClinicNew York State Psychiatric InstituteNew YorkUSA

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