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Archival Science

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 133–145 | Cite as

Beyond chip monks and paper tigers: towards a new culture of archival format specialists

  • Joanna Sassoon
Original Paper

Abstract

The emergence of the new format of electronic/digital records provides the opportunity for archivists to reconsider the presumed format-neutrality of professional practice. As research in electronic records has served to re-emphasise, without an understanding of the needs and forms of material, then the work of archivists can have a profound impact on the evidential value and long-term research potential of the material. This paper attempts to broaden the debate about the requirements of all archival formats, and to build a new regime of 21st-century format specialists.

Keywords

Photographic archives Electronic records Archival education Special formats 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Computer and Information SciencesEdith Cowan UniversityPerthAustralia

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