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Aquaculture International

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 481–497 | Cite as

Effects of fish oil and partial fish meal substitution with oilseed oils and meals on growth performance, nutrient utilization and health of the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

  • Derya GüroyEmail author
  • Betül Güroy
  • Daniel Lee Merrifield
  • Ahmet Adem Tekinay
  • Simon John Davies
  • İzzet Şahin
Article

Abstract

A feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of the replacement of dietary fish meal and fish oil with oilseed meals (soybean or canola) and canola oil on growth, nutrient utilization, body composition, diet digestibility and hematological parameters of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Seven diets were used; the control diet (designated FM) contained fish meal and fish oil as the main protein and lipid sources. For the experimental diets, 40% of fish meal protein was substituted with soybean meal, canola meal or a soybean/canola meal mixture, and these diets (designated SM, CM and SCM, respectively) contained fish oil as the lipid source. Three additional diets (SM + CO, CM + CO and SCM + CO) were formulated with the same vegetable protein meals but with fish oil replaced by canola oil. Fish were fed twice daily to apparent satiation for 11 weeks. The growth of fish fed the CM + CO diet was significantly lower than that of fish fed the FM, SCM, SM + CO and SCM + CO diets. The feed conversion ratio (FCR) was significantly better in fish fed the FM and SCM + CO diets than in fish fed the CM and CM + CO diets. Furthermore, feed intake was significantly lower for fish fed the CM + CO diet than in fish fed the SCM diet, and lipid digestibility of the CM + CO diet was significantly lower than that of all other diets. No significant differences of body composition were observed. Circulating leukocyte levels, leukocyte ratios and serum lysozyme activity remained unaffected by dietary treatment. However, it was observed that fish fed the CM + CO diet displayed hematocrit levels significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of fish fed the other diets. The results indicate that when diets contain either fish oil or canola oil, canola meal and soybean meal can be incorporated into rainbow trout feeds at a combined 32% inclusion level (replacing 40% of fish meal protein) without inducing significant negative effects on growth, nutrient utilization or health.

Keywords

Rainbow trout Canola meal Soybean meal Canola oil Growth Hematology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors kindly thank Zeki Sönmez, Volkan Tepe, Seda Karakoca, Sinem Kucukoguzsoylu, Mustafa Karga and Özden Oruçoğlu for their technical assistance. We would also like to thank Agromey Feed Mill Company and Kartal Chemical Incorporated for providing feed ingredients.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Derya Güroy
    • 1
    Email author
  • Betül Güroy
    • 1
  • Daniel Lee Merrifield
    • 2
  • Ahmet Adem Tekinay
    • 3
  • Simon John Davies
    • 2
  • İzzet Şahin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Aquaculture, Armutlu Vocational CollegeUniversity of YalovaYalovaTurkey
  2. 2.Aquaculture and Fish Nutrition Research Group, School of Biomedical and Biological SciencesThe University of PlymouthPlymouth, DevonUK
  3. 3.Department of Aquaculture, Faculty of FisheriesUniversity of İzmir Katip ÇelebiIzmirTurkey

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