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Aquaculture International

, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 443–453 | Cite as

Total fish meal replacement with rapeseed protein concentrate in diets fed to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum)

  • H. Slawski
  • H. Adem
  • R.-P. Tressel
  • K. Wysujack
  • U. Koops
  • Y. Kotzamanis
  • S. Wuertz
  • C. Schulz
Article

Abstract

The potential of rapeseed protein concentrate as fish meal alternative in diets for rainbow trout (initial average weight 37.8 ± 1.4 g) was evaluated. Nine experimental tanks of a freshwater flow-through system were stocked with 12 fish each. Triplicate groups of fish received isonitrogenous (47.9 ± 0.5% CP) and isoenergetic (22.4 ± 0.2 kJ g−1) experimental diets with 0, 66 and 100% of fish meal substituted with rapeseed protein concentrate (71.2% CP), thereby providing 0, 29 and 43% of dietary protein. As the amino acid profile of rapeseed protein concentrate was comparable to fish meal, there was no need to supplement experimental diets with synthetic amino acids. At the end of the 84 days of feeding period, fish growth performance, feed intake and feed efficiencies were not compromised, when 100% of fish meal in the control diet was replaced with rapeseed protein concentrate, revealing a SGR of 1.19 or 1.10, a FCR of 1.09 or 1.18 and a feed intake of 78.5 or 74.7 g in fish fed on the control diet or fed the diet devoid of fish meal, respectively. Intestinal morphology did not reveal any histological abnormalities in all dietary groups. Blood parameters including haematocrit and haemoglobin as well as glucose, triglycerides and total protein in the plasma were not different between treatment groups. Thus, the rapeseed protein concentrate tested here has great potential as an alternative to fish meal in rainbow trout diets.

Keywords

Fish meal alternative Rainbow trout Vegetable protein Rapeseed protein concentrate 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The project was financed by The European Fisheries Fund and the Zukunftsprogramm Fischerei des Landes Schleswig–Holstein.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Slawski
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Adem
    • 3
  • R.-P. Tressel
    • 3
  • K. Wysujack
    • 4
  • U. Koops
    • 4
  • Y. Kotzamanis
    • 5
  • S. Wuertz
    • 1
  • C. Schulz
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Gesellschaft für Marine Aquakultur mbHBüsumGermany
  2. 2.Department of Marine AquacultureChristian-Albrechts-Universität zu KielKielGermany
  3. 3.Pilot Pflanzenöltechnologie Magdeburg e.V.MagdeburgGermany
  4. 4.Johann Heinrich von Thünen-Institut, Federal Research Institute of Rural Areas, Forestry and FisheriesInstitute of Fisheries EcologyAhrensburgGermany
  5. 5.Hellenic Centre for Marine ResearchInstitute of AquacultureAthensGreece

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