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Apoptosis

pp 1–2 | Cite as

Potential role of anastasis in cancer initiation and progression

  • A. Thirumal Raj
  • Supriya KheurEmail author
  • Ramesh Bhonde
  • Archana A. Gupta
  • Vikrant R. Patil
  • Avinash Kharat
Letter to the Editor
  • 65 Downloads

Apoptosis is a well-established form of programmed cell death. Although the signaling pathway leading to apoptosis varies largely, the ultimate executors or the effector molecules of apoptosis are the caspases. Once activated these caspases cleave structural proteins ultimately resulting in cell death. Given the gross segmentation of vital cellular organelles noted during apoptosis, the general perception was that apoptosis was irreversible [1]. On the contrary, recent studies have found evidence suggesting that cells which are committed to apoptosis can stabilize and revert back [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]. Anastasis is one such pathway wherein after removal of the agent inducing apoptosis, the cells recover to a stable state [5]. Molecular analysis of anastasis has shown similarity to wound healing in the form of upregulated receptor tyrosine kinase, transforming growth factor-β, angiogenesis-promoting pathways and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling [1]. Like any repair mechanism, a...

Notes

References

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    Sun G, Guzman E, Balasanyan V, Conner CM, Wong K, Zhou HR et al (2017) A molecular signature for anastasis, recovery from the brink of apoptotic cell death. J Cell Biol.  https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201706134 Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Thirumal Raj
    • 1
  • Supriya Kheur
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ramesh Bhonde
    • 2
  • Archana A. Gupta
    • 1
  • Vikrant R. Patil
    • 3
  • Avinash Kharat
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Dr. D. Y. Patil Dental College and HospitalDr. D. Y. Patil VidyapeethPuneIndia
  2. 2.Dr. D. Y. Patil VidyapeethPuneIndia
  3. 3.Regenerative Medicine LaboratoryDr. D. Y. Patil VidyapeethPuneIndia

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