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DNS Study of Dust Particle Resuspension in a Fusion Reactor Induced by a Transonic Jet into Vacuum

Abstract

This paper reports on a two-phase flow Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) aimed at analyzing the resuspension of solid particles from a surface hit by a transonic jet inside a low pressure container. Conditions similar to those occurring in a fusion reactor vacuum vessel during a Loss of Vacuum Accident (LOVA) have been considered. Indeed, a deep understanding of the resuspension phenomenon is essential to make those reactors safe and suitable for a large-scale sustainable energy production. The jet Reynolds and Mach numbers are respectively set to 3300 and 1. The Thornton and Ning impact/adhesion model is adopted and improved. An advanced resuspension model, which takes into account the dynamics (rolling and slipping) of particles at the wall, is implemented. The use of this model combined with a DNS represents a great novelty in simulating the particle resuspension process. The particles initially deposited at the wall have constant density, whereas their diameters are drawn according to a log-normal distribution, with parameters obtained from experimental data. It has been found that the flow induced motion of wall deposited particles is highly linked with the instantaneous fluid structures and the resuspension phenomenon predominantly affects particles with the largest diameters. Moreover, the jet-deposit interaction is mostly confined within a circumference around the jet of radius approximately equal to the jet diameter.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    In the process of collision the yield pressure is reached at the center of the two bodies contact area when the plastic deformation attains the contact surface at its perimeter.

  2. 2.

    Being computed as the non-dimensional wall normal derivative of the temperature, the Nusselt number quantifies the heat transfer at the impinging plate.

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Acknowledgements

This work has been supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) as part of the Sonderforschungsbereich (SFB) 1029 at Technische Universität Berlin and performed with the support of the EU programme ERASMUS+ for the first author.

Funding Information

This paper has been funded by the Sonderforschungsbereich (SFB) 1029, granted by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

Author information

Correspondence to Gabriele Camerlengo.

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The authors declare that they do not have any conflict of interest in the authorship or publication of this contribution.

Electronic supplementary material

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Time evolution of the fluid velocity magnitude on a plane passing through the jet axis.

(MP4 1.58 MB)

(MP4 1.58 MB)

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Time evolution of the temperature on a plane passing through the jet axis and of the Nusselt number at the impingement plate.

(MP4 1.86 MB)

(MP4 1.86 MB)

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Time evolution of the local deposit surface density and count median diameter.

(MP4 0.99 MB)

(MP4 0.99 MB)

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Time evolution of the position of 10% of the resuspended particles, randomly sampled and colored by their diameter.

(MP4 4.30 MB)

(MP4 4.30 MB)

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Time evolution of the position of 10% of the resuspended particles, randomly sampled and colored by their velocity.

(MP4 4.89 MB)

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Camerlengo, G., Borello, D., Salvagni, A. et al. DNS Study of Dust Particle Resuspension in a Fusion Reactor Induced by a Transonic Jet into Vacuum. Flow Turbulence Combust 101, 247–267 (2018) doi:10.1007/s10494-017-9889-8

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Keywords

  • Particle-laden flow
  • Dust particle
  • Resuspension
  • Impact
  • DNS
  • Turbulence
  • Impinging jet
  • Nuclear fusion plants