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Experimental and Applied Acarology

, Volume 77, Issue 3, pp 435–447 | Cite as

Spatial distribution of Haemaphysalis species ticks and human Kyasanur Forest Disease cases along the Western Ghats of India, 2017–2018

  • N. Naren babu
  • Anup Jayaram
  • H. Hemanth Kumar
  • Prashant Pareet
  • Sarthak Pattanaik
  • Amogh Milind Auti
  • Jazeel Abdulmajeed
  • Hindol Maity
  • Santhosha Devadiga
  • Yuvraj Bhandari
  • H. Agre Deepchand
  • Muhammed Shakir
  • Nishikant Kumar
  • Govindakarnavar ArunkumarEmail author
Article

Abstract

Kyasanur Forest Disease (KFD) is a viral haemorrhagic fever, transmitted to humans and other hosts by a tick vector of genus Haemaphysalis. It affects 400–500 people annually in the Western Ghats region of India through spring to summer season. To understand the species composition, distribution, and abundance of Haemaphysalis ticks in endemic taluks (sub-districts) of India, a surveillance for ticks was conducted between October 2017 and January 2018. In total 105 sites were selected based on grid sampling from five taluks representing five KFD endemic states in south India. A sum of 8373 ticks were collected by using standard flagging method. The study showed a wide distribution of host seeking tick species among the selected taluks, wherein Haemaphysalis spinigera was predominant in 3/5 taluks, Haemaphysalis bispinosa in 1/5 taluks, and both the species in 1/5 taluks. Further, the H. spinigera abundance was categorised and compared with the incidence of human cases during the same season. The grids with very high and high H. spinigera abundance had 70% of the 205 human cases reported. This method of tick surveillance could be efficiently used as a standard model for KFD transmission risk assessment and prediction of impending outbreaks.

Keywords

Spatial distribution Haemaphysalis spinigera Tick abundance KFD vector Kyasarnur Forest Disease 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Authors acknowledge their sincere gratitude to all the state and district Government health officials of Wayanad in Kerala, Nilgiris in Tamilnadu, Shimoga in Karnataka, North Goa in Goa and Sindhudurg in Maharashtra for their immense support in executing this study. We would also like to extend our gratitude for all the AFI Project Administrators, Site managers, Specialists, Research assistants, technicians and field support staffs for their support in this study.

Author contributions

Designed the study: NBN, AJ; performed the experiment: NBN, AJ, HKH, PP, ADH, SP, MS, NK, YB, SD and AMA; GIS and data analysis: HM; wrote the paper: NBN, PP and SP; Reviewed: GA and all work supervised: GA and JA. All authors have read and approve the final version of the manuscript.

Funding

This work was partially funded from AFI project under the Cooperative Agreement, Grant no U01GH001051, awarded to GA, Manipal Academy of Higher Education by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declares that they have no conflict of interest.

Disclaimer

The views expressed in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Manipal Academy of Higher Education or the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Naren babu
    • 1
  • Anup Jayaram
    • 1
  • H. Hemanth Kumar
    • 1
  • Prashant Pareet
    • 1
  • Sarthak Pattanaik
    • 1
  • Amogh Milind Auti
    • 1
  • Jazeel Abdulmajeed
    • 1
  • Hindol Maity
    • 1
  • Santhosha Devadiga
    • 1
  • Yuvraj Bhandari
    • 1
  • H. Agre Deepchand
    • 1
  • Muhammed Shakir
    • 1
  • Nishikant Kumar
    • 1
  • Govindakarnavar Arunkumar
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Manipal Centre for Virus Research (Regional Reference Laboratory for Influenza Viruses and ICMR Virology Network Laboratory-Grade-I)Manipal Academy of Higher Education (Deemed to be University)ManipalIndia

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