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Experimental and Applied Acarology

, Volume 67, Issue 1, pp 147–157 | Cite as

In vitro acaricidal activity of ethanolic and aqueous floral extracts of Calendula officinalis against synthetic pyrethroid resistant Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

  • R. Godara
  • R. KatochEmail author
  • A. Yadav
  • R. R. Ahanger
  • A. D. S. Bhutyal
  • P. K. Verma
  • M. Katoch
  • S. Dutta
  • F. Nisa
  • N. K. Singh
Article

Abstract

Detection of resistance levels against deltamethrin and cypermethrin in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from Jammu (India) was carried out using larval packet test (LPT). The results showed the presence of resistance level II and I against deltamethrin and cypermethrin, respectively. Adult immersion test (AIT) and LPT were used to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of ethanolic and aqueous floral extracts of Calendula officinalis against synthetic pyrethroid resistant adults and larvae of R. (B.) microplus. Four concentrations (1.25, 2.5, 5 and 10 %) of each extract with four replications for each concentration were used in both the bioassays. A concentration dependent mortality was observed and it was more marked with ethanolic extract. In AIT, the LC50 values for ethanolic and aqueous extracts were calculated as 9.9 and 12.9 %, respectively. The egg weight of the live ticks treated with different concentrations of the ethanolic and aqueous extracts was significantly lower than that of control ticks; consequently, the reproductive index and the percent inhibition of oviposition values of the treated ticks were reduced. The complete inhibition of hatching was recorded at 10 % of ethanolic extract. The 10 % extracts caused 100 % mortality of larvae after 24 h. In LPT, the LC50 values for ethanolic and aqueous extracts were determined to be 2.6 and 3.2 %, respectively. It can be concluded that the ethanolic extract of C. officinalis had better acaricidal properties against adults and larvae of R. (B.) microplus than the aqueous extract.

Keywords

Acaricidal activity Calendula officinalis Ethanolic extract Resistance Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Godara
    • 1
  • R. Katoch
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. Yadav
    • 1
  • R. R. Ahanger
    • 1
  • A. D. S. Bhutyal
    • 1
  • P. K. Verma
    • 2
  • M. Katoch
    • 3
  • S. Dutta
    • 1
  • F. Nisa
    • 1
  • N. K. Singh
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Veterinary Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences and Animal HusbandrySher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and TechnologyR.S. Pura, JammuIndia
  2. 2.Division of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences and Animal HusbandrySher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and TechnologyR.S. Pura, JammuIndia
  3. 3.Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine (CSIR)JammuIndia
  4. 4.Department of Veterinary Parasitology, College of Veterinary ScienceGuru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences UniversityLudhianaIndia

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