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Experimental and Applied Acarology

, Volume 61, Issue 3, pp 383–386 | Cite as

Alarming spread of the Asian cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus in West Africa—another three countries are affected: Burkina Faso, Mali and Togo

  • H. Adakal
  • A. Biguezoton
  • S. Zoungrana
  • F. Courtin
  • E. M. De Clercq
  • M. Madder
Short Communication

The cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is known for its invasive character and fast displacement of other species of the same subgenus. The most striking invasions were the ones observed in Ivory Coast (Madder et al. 2007, 2011) and Benin (Madder et al. 2012; De Clercq et al. 2012). Several years after being introduced through importation of exotic Brazilian cattle, R. microplus replaced local blue ticks and most importantly did not respond to the acaricide treatment becoming thus for farmers and veterinary services an uncontrollable ectoparasite affecting animal production in general, apart from being an efficient vector of Babesia bovis.

Soon after its discovery in West Africa, several projects were initiated to address the issue. The TickRisk project (assessing ecological suitability for the spread of R. microplus in West Africa) (2011–2013) was implemented in Benin to determine the current spread of this species and develop habitat suitability maps of the region while...

Keywords

Ivory Coast Babesia Tick Infestation Veterinary Service Acaricide Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was funded by Australian Aid (AusAID). The authors acknowledge the support of their research partners in the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and in the West and Central African Council for Agricultural Research and Development (CORAF/WECARD).

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Adakal
    • 1
  • A. Biguezoton
    • 1
  • S. Zoungrana
    • 1
  • F. Courtin
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. M. De Clercq
    • 3
  • M. Madder
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Centre international de recherche-développement sur l’élevage en zone subhumide (CIRDES)Bobo-DioulassoBurkina Faso
  2. 2.Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), UMR 177 IRD-CIRADMontpellierFrance
  3. 3.Georges Lemaître Centre for Earth and Climate Research, Earth and Life InstituteUniversité Catholique de LouvainLouvain-la-NeuveBelgium
  4. 4.Unit of Veterinary Entomology, Department of Biomedical SciencesInstitute of Tropical MedicineAntwerpBelgium
  5. 5.Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceUniversity of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa

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