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Experimental and Applied Acarology

, Volume 58, Issue 2, pp 175–182 | Cite as

Ixodes ricinus is the dominant questing tick in forest habitats in Romania: the results from a countrywide dragging campaign

  • A. D. Mihalca
  • C. M. Gherman
  • C. Magdaş
  • M. O. Dumitrache
  • A. Györke
  • A. D. Sándor
  • C. Domşa
  • M. Oltean
  • V. Mircean
  • D. I. Mărcuţan
  • G. D’Amico
  • A. O. Păduraru
  • V. Cozma
Article

Abstract

In 2010 and 2011, questing ticks were collected from 188 forested locations in all the 41 counties of Romania using the dragging method. The total of 13,771 ticks collected belonged to eleven species: Ixodes ricinus (86.9 %), Dermacentor marginatus (9.5 %), Haemaphysalis punctata (2.6 %), H. concinna (0.6 %), H. sulcata (0.3 %), H. parva (0.1 %), Hyalomma marginatum (0.02 %), D. reticulatus (0.02 %), I. crenulatus (0.007 %), I. hexagonus (0.007 %) and I. laguri (0.007 %). Ixodes ricinus was present in 97.7 % (n = 180) of locations, occurring exclusively in 41.7 % of the locations, whereas it was the dominant species in 38.8 % of the other locations, accounting for over 70 % of the total tick community. The following most common questing ticks were D. marginatus, H. punctata and H. concinna. Ixodes ricinus co-occurred with one, two or three sympatric species. The occurrence of D. reticulatus in forested habitats from Romania was found to be accidental.

Keywords

Ixodes ricinus Questing ticks Tick community Romania 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported from grant CNCSIS IDEI PCCE 7/2010 and POSDRU/88/1.5/S/60185 (to SDA). The authors are grateful to all students who voluntarily participated in the tremendous field work.

Supplementary material

10493_2012_9568_MOESM1_ESM.kml (210 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (KML 210 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Mihalca
    • 1
  • C. M. Gherman
    • 1
  • C. Magdaş
    • 1
  • M. O. Dumitrache
    • 1
  • A. Györke
    • 1
  • A. D. Sándor
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Domşa
    • 1
  • M. Oltean
    • 1
  • V. Mircean
    • 1
  • D. I. Mărcuţan
    • 1
  • G. D’Amico
    • 1
  • A. O. Păduraru
    • 3
  • V. Cozma
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Parasitology and Parasitic DiseasesUniversity of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary MedicineCluj-NapocaRomania
  2. 2.Department of Taxonomy and EcologyBabeş-Bolyai UniversityCluj-NapocaRomania
  3. 3.Department of Public Health“Ion Ionescu de la Brad” University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary MedicineIaşiRomania

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