Experimental and Applied Acarology

, Volume 54, Issue 2, pp 199–204 | Cite as

First survey on hard ticks (Ixodidae) collected from humans in Romania: possible risks for tick-borne diseases

  • V. T. Briciu
  • A. Titilincu
  • D. F. Ţăţulescu
  • D. Cârstina
  • M. Lefkaditis
  • A. D. Mihalca
Article

Abstract

The importance of studies on the diversity of ticks attacking humans resides mostly in the relatively highly-specific tick-pathogen associations. Human tick bites are commonly reported worldwide but removal of ticks from patients is rarely followed by specific identification of the ticks, leaving to some degree of hazard the preventive treatment of possible associated diseases. A total number of 308 ticks were collected between April and June 2010 from 275 human patients who voluntarily presented to a hospital from Cluj-Napoca, Romania. The mean intensity of infection was 1.12 ± 0.46. Four species of ticks were identified Ixodes ricinus, Dermacentor marginatus, Haemaphysalis concinna and H. punctata. Ixodes ricinus was the most abundant species feeding on humans in the study area. A brief review of possible associated pathogen is provided.

Keywords

Ixodidae Humans Tick-borne disease Romania 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The publication of this paper was supported from grant IDEI-PCCE CNCSIS 84, 7/2010 and from a project co-financed by E.S.F POSDRU 88/1.5/S/56949.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. T. Briciu
    • 1
  • A. Titilincu
    • 2
  • D. F. Ţăţulescu
    • 1
  • D. Cârstina
    • 1
  • M. Lefkaditis
    • 3
  • A. D. Mihalca
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Infectious DiseasesUniversity of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu HaţieganuCluj-NapocaRomania
  2. 2.Department of Parasitology and Parasitic DiseasesUniversity of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary MedicineCluj, Cluj-NapocaRomania
  3. 3.Laboratory of Microbiology and Parasitology, Veterinary SchoolUniversity of KarditsaKarditsaGreece

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