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Applied Intelligence

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 155–180 | Cite as

Agent-based execution of personalised home care treatments

  • David IsernEmail author
  • Antonio Moreno
  • David Sánchez
  • Ákos Hajnal
  • Gianfranco Pedone
  • László Z. Varga
Article

Abstract

Home Care services are notoriously difficult to deliver efficiently, due to the heterogeneity of the involved actors and the usual co-morbidity of the patients assisted at home. The K4Care platform proposes an agent-based three-layered architecture aimed at addressing these two issues and facilitate the provision of these services. The development of the platform was supported by a methodology to help the automation of the modelling and implementation of the multi-agent system. The intelligent agents of the platform, which personify the Home Care domain actors, have the capability to guide the execution of administrative and medical processes, driving the flux of knowledge and control among all the involved professionals, simplifying their interactions and capturing new medical knowledge emerging from physicians. The platform also provides tools that allow medical practitioners to develop personalised treatments, adapted to the clinical and social circumstances of each patient and based on the standard international recommendations for the most frequent Home Care pathologies. The paper describes the architecture of the system, how personalised treatments are created, and how they are executed through the co-ordinated work of agents. A comparison with other relevant guideline execution systems and an evaluation of the actual state of the work are also provided.

Keywords

Medical informatics Ubiquitous healthcare Personalisation of healthcare Formal intervention plans Agents in healthcare 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Isern
    • 1
    Email author
  • Antonio Moreno
    • 1
  • David Sánchez
    • 1
  • Ákos Hajnal
    • 2
  • Gianfranco Pedone
    • 2
  • László Z. Varga
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and Mathematics, Intelligent Technologies for Advanced Knowledge Acquisition (ITAKA) Research GroupUniversity Rovira i VirgiliTarragonaSpain
  2. 2.Computer and Automation Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Sztaki)BudapestHungary

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