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Availability of Youth Services in U.S. Mental Health Treatment Facilities

  • Janet R. Cummings
  • Brady G. Case
  • Xu Ji
  • Steven C. Marcus
Original Article

Abstract

Despite concern about access to mental health (MH) services for youth, little is known about the specialty treatment infrastructure serving this population. We used national data to examine which types of MH treatment facilities (hospital- and community-based) were most likely to offer youth services and which types of communities were most likely to have this infrastructure. Larger (p < 0.001) and privately owned (p < 0.001) facilities were more likely to offer youth services. Rural counties, counties in which a majority of residents were nonwhite, and/or counties with a higher percentage of uninsured residents were less likely to have a community-based MH treatment facility that served youth (p < 0.001).

Keywords

Children and adolescents Access to services Mental health facilities 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (K01MH095823). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janet R. Cummings
    • 1
  • Brady G. Case
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Xu Ji
    • 1
  • Steven C. Marcus
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Health Policy and Management, Rollins School of Public HealthEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Health Services Research ProgramBradley Hospital East ProvidenceUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorAlpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  4. 4.Department of Health Services, Policy and PracticeBrown School of Public HealthProvidenceUSA
  5. 5.Center for Health Equity Research & PromotionPhiladelphia Veterans Affairs Medical CenterPhiladelphiaUSA
  6. 6.School of Social Policy & PracticeUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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