Design Elements in Implementation Research: A Structured Review of Child Welfare and Child Mental Health Studies

  • John Landsverk
  • C. Hendricks Brown
  • Jennifer Rolls Reutz
  • Lawrence Palinkas
  • Sarah McCue Horwitz
ORIGINAL PAPER

DOI: 10.1007/s10488-010-0315-y

Cite this article as:
Landsverk, J., Brown, C.H., Rolls Reutz, J. et al. Adm Policy Ment Health (2011) 38: 54. doi:10.1007/s10488-010-0315-y

Abstract

Implementation science is an emerging field of research with considerable penetration in physical medicine and less in the fields of mental health and social services. There remains a lack of consensus on methodological approaches to the study of implementation processes and tests of implementation strategies. This paper addresses the need for methods development through a structured review that describes design elements in nine studies testing implementation strategies for evidence-based interventions addressing mental health problems of children in child welfare and child mental health settings. Randomized trial designs were dominant with considerable use of mixed method designs in the nine studies published since 2005. The findings are discussed in reference to the limitations of randomized designs in implementation science and the potential for use of alternative designs.

Keywords

Child welfare Child mental health Implementation research Research design 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Landsverk
    • 1
  • C. Hendricks Brown
    • 2
  • Jennifer Rolls Reutz
    • 1
  • Lawrence Palinkas
    • 3
  • Sarah McCue Horwitz
    • 4
  1. 1.Child and Adolescent Services Research Center (CASRC)Rady Children’s Hospital San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of MedicineUniversity of MiamiMiamiUSA
  3. 3.School of Social WorkUniversity of Southern California and Child and Adolescent ServicesLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Department of Pediatrics and the Centers for Health Policy and Primary Care and Outcomes ResearchStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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