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Toward Enough of the Best for All: Research to Transform the Efficacy, Quality, and Reach of Mental Health Care for Youth

  • Beverly Pringle
  • David Chambers
  • Philip S. Wang
Original Paper

“The food here is terrible… and such small portions.”

Woody Allen, Annie Hall 1977

The articles in this special journal issue observe the same paradox about mental health services for children and adolescents expressed in this old joke about food. Taken together, they make the case that current mental health care for children and adolescents is of poor quality and questionable effectiveness, and, moreover, is delivered in inadequate doses to a only a fraction of the nation’s youth who need it. In order to address these shortcomings in quality, quantity, and effectiveness, the authors mainly agree to eschew traditional individual-level approaches to addressing mental health problems in favor of a public health approach. A public health approach would target the population, in contrast to individuals, with a range of consistently high-quality services to meet diverse needs and, thus, provide maximum mental health benefit for the greatest number of youth.

A public health approach, and the...

Keywords

Mental Health Mental Illness Mental Health Service Mental Health Care Foster Care 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Beverly Pringle
    • 1
  • David Chambers
    • 2
  • Philip S. Wang
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Services and Intervention ResearchNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Division of Services and Intervention ResearchNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Office of the DirectorNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA

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