Medicare Inpatient Treatment for Elderly Non-dementia Psychiatric Illnesses 1992–2002; Length of Stay and Expenditures by Facility Type

  • Donald R. Hoover
  • Ayse Akincigil
  • Jonathan D. Prince
  • Ece Kalay
  • Judith A. Lucas
  • James T. Walkup
  • Stephen Crystal
Original Paper

Abstract

We summarize Medicare utilization and payment for inpatient treatment of non-dementia psychiatric illnesses (NDPI) among the elderly during 1992 and 2002. From 1992 to 2002, overall mean Medicare expenditures per elderly NDPI inpatient stay declined by $2,254 (in 2002 dollars) and covered days by 2.8. However, these changes are complicated by expanded use of skilled nursing facilities and hospital psychiatric units, and decreased use of long-stay hospitals and general hospital beds. This suggests that inpatient treatment for NDPI is shifting into less expensive settings which may reflect cost-cutting strategies, preferences for less restrictive settings, and outpatient treatment advances.

Keywords

Non-dementia psychiatric illnesses Inpatient care Expenditures Length of stay Elderly 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald R. Hoover
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ayse Akincigil
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jonathan D. Prince
    • 1
    • 3
  • Ece Kalay
    • 1
  • Judith A. Lucas
    • 1
  • James T. Walkup
    • 1
    • 4
  • Stephen Crystal
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Health Services Research on Pharmacotherapy, Chronic Disease Management, and Outcomes, Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research (IHHCPAR) at RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA
  2. 2.Department of Statistics and Biostatistics at RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA
  3. 3.School of Social Work at RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNew BrunswickUSA
  4. 4.Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology at Rutgers UniversityThe State University of New JerseyPiscatawayUSA

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