National Estimates for Mental Health Mutual Support Groups, Self-Help Organizations, and Consumer-Operated Services

  • Ingrid D. Goldstrom
  • Jean Campbell
  • Joseph A. Rogers
  • David B. Lambert
  • Beatrice Blacklow
  • Marilyn J. Henderson
  • Ronald W. Manderscheid
Article

Abstract

The authors report on a 2002 national survey of mental health mutual support groups (MSG) and self-help organizations (SHO) run by and for mental health consumers and/or family members, and consumer-operated services (COS). They found 7467 of these groups and organizations—3315 MSGs, 3019 SHOs, and 1133 COSs—greatly eclipsing the number of traditional mental health organizations (4546). MSGs reported that 41,363 people attended their last meetings. SHOs reported a total of 1,005,400 members. COSs reported serving 534,551 clients/members in 1 year. The array of services and supports provided within each of these types (MSG, SHO, COS) is reported, and implications for the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health recommendations are explicated.

Keywords

CMHS consumer-operated services mental health mutual support groups self-help organizations 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ingrid D. Goldstrom
    • 1
    • 7
  • Jean Campbell
    • 2
  • Joseph A. Rogers
    • 3
  • David B. Lambert
    • 4
  • Beatrice Blacklow
    • 5
  • Marilyn J. Henderson
    • 6
  • Ronald W. Manderscheid
    • 6
  1. 1.Social Science Analyst, Survey and Analysis Branch, Division of State and Community Systems DevelopmentCenter for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesRockvilleUSA
  2. 2.Missouri Institute of Mental Health, University of Missouri-Columbia School of MedicineColumbiaUSA
  3. 3.President and Chief Executive Officer, Mental Health Association of Southeastern PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.TNSHorshamUSA
  5. 5.Research Analyst, Synectics for Management Decisions, Inc.ArlingtonUSA
  6. 6.Assistant Branch Chief (Retired) and Branch Chief Survey and Analysis Branch, Division of State and Community Systems DevelopmentCenter for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesRockvilleUSA
  7. 7.Ingrid GoldstromCenter for Mental Health ServicesRockvilleUSA

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