Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback

, Volume 37, Issue 4, pp 241–251

Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback Reduces Food Cravings in High Food Cravers

  • Adrian Meule
  • Rebecca Freund
  • Ann Kathrin Skirde
  • Claus Vögele
  • Andrea Kübler
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s10484-012-9197-y

Cite this article as:
Meule, A., Freund, R., Skirde, A.K. et al. Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback (2012) 37: 241. doi:10.1007/s10484-012-9197-y

Abstract

Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback has been reported to increase HRV while decreasing symptoms in patients with mental disorders. In addition, associations between low HRV and lowered self-regulation were found in non-clinical samples, e.g., in individuals with strong chocolate cravings or unsuccessful dieting. The current study aimed at decreasing food cravings with HRV-biofeedback in individuals frequently experiencing such cravings. Participants (N = 56) with strong or low food cravings associated with a lack of control over eating were selected from the local community. Half of the participants with strong cravings (craving-biofeedback; n = 14) performed 12 sessions of HRV-biofeedback while the other half (craving-control; n = 14) and a group with low cravings (non-craving-control; n = 28) received no intervention. Subjective food cravings related to a lack of control over eating decreased from pre- to post-measurement in the craving-biofeedback group, but remained constant in the control groups. Moreover, only the craving-biofeedback group showed a decrease in eating and weight concerns. Although HRV-biofeedback was successful in reducing food cravings, this change was not accompanied by an increase in HRV. Instead, HRV decreased in the craving-control group. This study provides preliminary evidence that HRV-biofeedback could be beneficial for attenuating dysfunctional eating behavior although specific mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

Keywords

Food cravings Eating behavior Cardiac autonomic regulation Heart rate variability Biofeedback 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adrian Meule
    • 1
  • Rebecca Freund
    • 1
  • Ann Kathrin Skirde
    • 1
  • Claus Vögele
    • 2
  • Andrea Kübler
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Psychology IUniversity of WürzburgWürzburgGermany
  2. 2.Research Unit INSIDEUniversité du LuxembourgWalferdangeLuxembourg
  3. 3.Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioural NeurobiologyUniversity of TübingenTübingenGermany

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