Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 83–93 | Cite as

Biofeedback in the Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain: A Time-Series Analysis

  • R. Norman Harden
  • Timothy T. Houle
  • Samara Green
  • Thomas A. Remble
  • Stephan R. Weinland
  • Sean Colio
  • Jeffrey Lauzon
  • Todd Kuiken
Article

Abstract

Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a noxious, painful sensation that is perceived to occur in an amputated limb. It has been reported to occur in up to 85% of amputees. This pilot study examined the effectiveness of biofeedback in the treatment of nine individuals with PLP who received up to seven thermal/autogenic biofeedback sessions over the course of 4–6 weeks. Pain was assessed daily using the visual analog scale (VAS), the sum of the sensory descriptors, and the sum of the affective descriptors of the McGill short form. Interrupted time-series analytical models were created for each of the participants, allowing biofeedback sessions to be modeled as discrete interventions. Analyses of the VAS revealed that a 20% pain reduction was seen in five of the nine patients in the weeks after session 4, and that at least a 30% pain reduction (range: 25–66%) was seen in six of the seven patients in the weeks following session 6. Sensory descriptors of pain decreased more than the affective pain descriptors. These preliminary results provide some support for the use of biofeedback in the treatment of PLP and indicate the need for further, definitive study.

Keywords

phantom limb pain post amputee pain thermal biofeedback time-series analysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Norman Harden
    • 1
    • 2
  • Timothy T. Houle
    • 1
  • Samara Green
    • 1
  • Thomas A. Remble
    • 1
  • Stephan R. Weinland
    • 1
  • Sean Colio
    • 1
  • Jeffrey Lauzon
    • 1
  • Todd Kuiken
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Pain StudiesRehabilitation Institute of Chicago/Northwestern University Medical SchoolChicago
  2. 2.Center for Pain StudiesRehabilitation Institute of ChicagoChicago

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