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Applied Mathematics and Mechanics

, Volume 40, Issue 4, pp 421–434 | Cite as

Combined effects of topography and bottom friction on shoaling internal solitary waves in the South China Sea

  • Dalin Tan
  • Jifu ZhouEmail author
  • Xu Wang
  • Zhan Wang
Article
  • 42 Downloads

Abstract

A numerical study to a generalized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is adopted to model the propagation and disintegration of large-amplitude internal solitary waves (ISWs) in the South China Sea (SCS). Based on theoretical analysis and in situ measurements, the drag coefficient of the Chezy friction is regarded as inversely proportional to the initial amplitude of an ISW, rather than a constant as assumed in the previous studies. Numerical simulations of ISWs propagating from a deep basin to a continental shelf are performed with the generalized KdV model. It is found that the depression waves are disintegrated into several solitons on the continental shelf due to the variable topography. It turns out that the amplitude of the leading ISW reaches a maximum at the shelf break, which is consistent with the field observation in the SCS. Moreover, a dimensionless parameter defining the relative importance of the variable topography and friction is presented.

Key words

internal solitary wave (ISW) South China Sea (SCS) Chezy friction variable topography 

Chinese Library Classification

O352 O353.2 

2010 Mathematics Subject Classification

35Q53 76B55 

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Copyright information

© Shanghai University and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Key Laboratory for Mechanics in Fluid Solid Coupling Systems, Institute of MechanicsChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  2. 2.School of Engineering SciencesUniversity of Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina

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