Cachaça yeast strains: alternative starters to produce beer and bioethanol

  • Thalita Macedo Araújo
  • Magalhães Teixeira Souza
  • Raphael Hermano Santos Diniz
  • Celina Kiyomi Yamakawa
  • Lauren Bergmann Soares
  • Jaciane Lutz Lenczak
  • Juliana Velasco de Castro Oliveira
  • Gustavo Henrique Goldman
  • Edilene Alves Barbosa
  • Anna Clara Silva Campos
  • Ieso Miranda Castro
  • Rogelio Lopes Brandão
Original Paper
  • 12 Downloads

Abstract

This work was performed to verify the potential of yeast strains isolated from cachaça distilleries for two specific biotechnological applications: beer and bioethanol production. In the beer production, the strains were tested for characteristics required in brewery practices, such as: capacity to ferment maltose and maltotriose, ability to grow at lowest temperatures, low H2S production, and flocculation profile. Among the strains tested, two of them showed appropriate characteristics to produce two different beer styles: lager and ale. Moreover, both strains were tested for cachaça production and the results confirmed the capacity of these strains to improve the quality of cachaça. In the bioethanol production, the fermentation process was performed similarly to that used by bioethanol industries: recycling of yeast biomass in the fermentative process with sulfuric acid washings (pH 2.0). The production of ethanol, glycerol, organic acids, dry cell weight, carbohydrate consumption, and cellular viability were analyzed. One strain presented fermentative parameters similar to PE2, industrial/commercial strain, with equivalent ethanol yields and cellular viability during all fermentative cycles. This work demonstrates that cachaça distilleries seem to be an interesting environment to select new yeast strains to be used in biotechnology applications as beer and bioethanol production.

Keywords

Beer Bioethanol Cachaça Flavoring compounds 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by grants from Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES/Brazil - Program AUXPE-DINTER 2499/2008); Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de Minas Gerais (FAPEMIG/Brazil - Process APQ-00209-12); and from Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq/Brazil - Process 304815/2012-3 - research fellowship to RLB and Process 580185/2008-7). We are grateful to CNPEM and CTBE for helpful assistance with fermentation techniques and chromatographic analysis as well as to multiuser laboratories for mass spectrometry and microscopy: NUPEB, UFOP.

Conflict of interest

All co-authors have seen and agreed with the content of the manuscript, and none of the co-authors have any financial interests to disclose.

Supplementary material

10482_2018_1063_MOESM1_ESM.docx (29 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 30 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thalita Macedo Araújo
    • 1
  • Magalhães Teixeira Souza
    • 1
  • Raphael Hermano Santos Diniz
    • 1
  • Celina Kiyomi Yamakawa
    • 2
  • Lauren Bergmann Soares
    • 2
  • Jaciane Lutz Lenczak
    • 2
  • Juliana Velasco de Castro Oliveira
    • 2
  • Gustavo Henrique Goldman
    • 2
  • Edilene Alves Barbosa
    • 1
  • Anna Clara Silva Campos
    • 1
  • Ieso Miranda Castro
    • 1
  • Rogelio Lopes Brandão
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratório de Biologia Celular e Molecular, Núcleo de Pesquisas em Ciências Biológicas (NUPEB)Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP)Ouro PretoBrazil
  2. 2.Laboratório Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE)Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (CNPEM)CampinasBrazil

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