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Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 108, Issue 5, pp 1275–1279 | Cite as

Tellurite resistance: a putative pitfall in Corynebacterium diphtheriae diagnosis?

  • Louisy Sanches dos Santos
  • Camila Azevedo Antunes
  • Daniel Martins de Oliveira
  • Lincoln de Oliveira Sant’Anna
  • José Augusto Adler Pereira
  • Raphael Hirata Júnior
  • Andreas Burkovski
  • Ana Luíza Mattos-GuaraldiEmail author
Short Communication

Abstract

Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains continue to circulate worldwide causing diphtheria and invasive diseases, such as endocarditis, osteomyelitis, pneumonia and catheter-related infections. Presumptive C. diphtheriae infections diagnosis in a clinical microbiology laboratory requires a primary isolation consisting of a bacterial culture on blood agar and agar containing tellurite (TeO 3 2− ). In this study, nine genome sequenced and four unsequenced strains of C. diphtheriae from different sources, including three samples from a recent outbreak in Brazil, were characterized with respect to their growth properties on tellurite-containing agar. Levels of tellurite-resistance (TeR) were evaluated by determining the minimum inhibitory concentrations of potassium tellurite (K2TeO3) and by a viability reduction test in solid culture medium with K2TeO3. Significant differences in TeR levels of C. diphtheriae strains were observed independent of origin, biovar or presence of the tox gene. Data indicated that the standard initial screening with TeO 3 2− -selective medium for diphtheria bacilli identification may lead to false-negative results in C. diphtheriae diagnosis laboratories.

Keywords

Corynebacterium diphtheriae Diphtheria Invasive infections Telurite-resistance Laboratory diagnosis 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This is work was supported by Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES), Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FAPERJ), Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq), Sub-Reitoria de Pós-Graduação e Pesquisa da Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (SR-2/UERJ).

Compliance with ethical standards

Competing interests

The authors disclose any financial and personal relationships with other people or organizations that could inappropriately influence their work. All authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louisy Sanches dos Santos
    • 1
  • Camila Azevedo Antunes
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Daniel Martins de Oliveira
    • 2
  • Lincoln de Oliveira Sant’Anna
    • 2
  • José Augusto Adler Pereira
    • 2
  • Raphael Hirata Júnior
    • 2
  • Andreas Burkovski
    • 3
  • Ana Luíza Mattos-Guaraldi
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Instituto de Ciências BiológicasUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil
  2. 2.Faculdade de Ciências MédicasUniversidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro – UERJRio De JaneiroBrazil
  3. 3.Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-NürnbergErlangenGermany

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