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Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 104, Issue 2, pp 243–252 | Cite as

Coniochaeta polymorpha, a new species from endotracheal aspirate of a preterm neonate, and transfer of Lecythophora species to Coniochaeta

  • Ziauddin Khan
  • Josepa Gené
  • Suhail Ahmad
  • Josep Cano
  • Noura Al-Sweih
  • Leena Joseph
  • Rachel Chandy
  • Josep Guarro
Original Paper

Abstract

A new species of Coniochaeta from endotracheal secretion of a preterm neonate, Coniochaeta polymorpha, is described. This anamorphic species is characterized by development of dark brown colonies after 1 week of incubation on culture medium, formation of abundant yeast-like cells and sclerotium-like structures producing discrete, brown, nearly globose phialidic conidiogenous cells and absence of chlamydospores. A combined sequence dataset of the ITS region, partial LSU rDNA, actin and β-tubulin genes sufficiently resolved the unique phylogenetic status of this species. In response to recent changes in the nomenclature for pleomorphic fungi, we transfer the Lecythophora species to Coniochaeta, and propose the following new combinations: Coniochaeta canina, Coniochaeta cateniformis, Coniochaeta decumbens, Coniochaeta fasciculata, Coniochaeta hoffmannii, Coniochaeta lignicola, Coniochaeta luteorubra, Coniochaeta luteoviridis and Coniochaeta mutabilis.

Keywords

Coniochaetales Clinical source Lecythophora Ribosomal DNA Single-copy genes Taxonomy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Authors are thankful to Dr. Seema Khan for providing patient details. Technical support extended by S. Vayalil and A. Theyyathel is acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ziauddin Khan
    • 1
  • Josepa Gené
    • 2
  • Suhail Ahmad
    • 1
  • Josep Cano
    • 2
  • Noura Al-Sweih
    • 1
  • Leena Joseph
    • 1
  • Rachel Chandy
    • 1
  • Josep Guarro
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyFaculty of Medicine, Kuwait UniversityKuwait CityKuwait
  2. 2.Mycology Unit, IISPV & Medical School, Universitat Rovira i VirgiliReusSpain

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