Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 103, Issue 2, pp 409–420

Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the microbial community in a simulator of the human gastrointestinal tract showed a colon region-specific microbiota modulation for two plant-derived polysaccharide blends

  • Massimo Marzorati
  • Lois Maignien
  • An Verhelst
  • Gabriela Luta
  • Robert Sinnott
  • Frederiek Maarten Kerckhof
  • Nico Boon
  • Tom Van de Wiele
  • Sam Possemiers
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10482-012-9821-0

Cite this article as:
Marzorati, M., Maignien, L., Verhelst, A. et al. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek (2013) 103: 409. doi:10.1007/s10482-012-9821-0

Abstract

The combination of a Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem with ad hoc molecular techniques (i.e. pyrosequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR) allowed an evaluation of the extent to which two plant polysaccharide supplements could modify a complex gut microbial community. The presence of Aloe vera gel powder and algae extract in product B as compared to the standard blend (product A) improved its fermentation along the entire simulated colon. The potential extended effect of product B in the simulated distal colon, as compared to product A, was confirmed by: (i) the separate clustering of the samples before and after the treatment in the phylogenetic-based dendrogram and OTU-based PCoA plot only for product B; (ii) a higher richness estimator (+33 vs. −36 % of product A); and (iii) a higher dynamic parameter (21 vs. 13 %). These data show that the combination of well designed in vitro simulators with barcoded pyrosequencing is a powerful tool for characterizing changes occurring in the gut microbiota following a treatment. However, for the quantification of low-abundance species—of interest because of their relationship to potential positive health effects (i.e. bifidobacteria or lactobacilli)—conventional molecular ecological approaches, such as PCR–DGGE and qPCR, still remain a very useful complementary tool.

Keywords

Gastrointestinal resource management (GRM) Pyrosequencing Ambrotose SHIME Intestinal bacteria 

Supplementary material

10482_2012_9821_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (466 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 466 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massimo Marzorati
    • 1
  • Lois Maignien
    • 1
  • An Verhelst
    • 2
  • Gabriela Luta
    • 3
  • Robert Sinnott
    • 3
  • Frederiek Maarten Kerckhof
    • 1
  • Nico Boon
    • 1
  • Tom Van de Wiele
    • 1
  • Sam Possemiers
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET)Ghent UniversityGhentBelgium
  2. 2.ProDigestGhentBelgium
  3. 3.Mannatech IncCoppellUSA

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