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Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 101, Issue 4, pp 811–817 | Cite as

Geodermatophilus nigrescens sp. nov., isolated from a dry-hot valley

  • Guo-Xing Nie
  • Hong Ming
  • Shuai Li
  • En-Min Zhou
  • Juan Cheng
  • Tian-Tian Yu
  • Jing Zhang
  • Hui-Gen Feng
  • Shu-Kun TangEmail author
  • Wen-Jun LiEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

A novel actinomycete, designated as strain YIM 75980T, was isolated from a soil sample collected from a dry-hot river valley in Dongchuan county, Yunnan province, south-west China and was subjected to polyphasic taxonomic characterization. The organism produced circular, smooth, red to black coloured colonies comprising coccoid-shaped cells. Colonies on agar medium lacked mycelia and cells adhered to the agar. Strain YIM 75980T contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan and contained galactose, arabinose and glucosamine as the main sugars in the whole-cell hydrolysates. The predominant menaquinone was MK-9 (H4) and the major fatty acids were iso-C15:0, iso-C16:0 and C16:0. The DNA G + C content of strain YIM 75980T was 73.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences clearly showed that strain YIM 75980T formed a distinct clade within the genus Geodermatophilus and was closely related to Geodermatophilus obscurus DSM 43160T (level of similarity, 97.9%). Furthermore, the result of DNA–DNA hybridization between strain YIM 75980T and G. obscurus 43160T demonstrated that this isolate represented a different genomic species in the genus Geodermatophilus. Moreover, the physiological and biochemical data showed the differentiation of strain YIM 75980T from its closest phylogenetic neighbour. Therefore, it is proposed that strain YIM 75980T represents a novel species of the genus Geodermatophilus, for which the name Geodermatophilus nigrescens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YIM 75980T (=CCTCC AA 2011015T =JCM 18056T).

Keywords

Geodermatophilusnigrescens sp. nov. 16S rRNA gene Polyphasic taxonomy 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to Prof. Hans-Peter Klenk (DSMZ) for his kind providing type strain Geodermatophilus obscurus DSM 43160T. This research was supported by Science and Technology Innovation Talents Program in Universities of Henan Province of China (HASTIT, No. 2010HASTIT020) and Key Technologies R & D Program of Henan Province of China (112102310335).

Supplementary material

10482_2012_9696_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (1 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 1.03 Mb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guo-Xing Nie
    • 1
  • Hong Ming
    • 2
    • 3
  • Shuai Li
    • 1
  • En-Min Zhou
    • 3
  • Juan Cheng
    • 3
  • Tian-Tian Yu
    • 3
  • Jing Zhang
    • 3
  • Hui-Gen Feng
    • 2
  • Shu-Kun Tang
    • 3
    Email author
  • Wen-Jun Li
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.College of Life SciencesHenan Normal UniversityXinxiangPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of Life Sciences and TechnologyXinxiang Medical UniversityXinxiangPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Key Laboratory of Microbial Diversity in Southwest China, Ministry of Education and Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-resources, Yunnan Institute of MicrobiologyYunnan UniversityKunmingPeople’s Republic of China

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