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Antonie van Leeuwenhoek

, Volume 101, Issue 2, pp 323–329 | Cite as

Fusarium proliferatum, an endophytic fungus from Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook.f, produces rohitukine, a chromane alkaloid possessing anti-cancer activity

  • Patel Mohana Kumara
  • Sebastian Zuehlke
  • Vaidyanathan Priti
  • Bheemanahally Thimmappa Ramesha
  • Singh Shweta
  • Gudasalamani Ravikanth
  • Ramesh Vasudeva
  • Thankayyan Retnabai Santhoshkumar
  • Michael Spiteller
  • Ramanan Uma ShaankerEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Rohitukine is a chromane alkaloid possessing anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and immuno-modulatory properties. The compound was first reported from Amoora rohituka (Meliaceae) and later from Dysoxylum binectariferum (Meliaceae) and Schumanniophyton problematicum (Rubiaceae). Flavopiridol, a semi-synthetic derivative of rohitukine is a potent CDK inhibitor and is currently in Phase III clinical trials. In this study, the isolation of an endophytic fungus, Fusarium proliferatum (MTCC 9690) from the inner bark tissue of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook.f (Meliaceae) is reported. The endophytic fungus produces rohitukine when cultured in shake flasks containing potato dextrose broth. The yield of rohitukine was 186 μg/100 g dry mycelial weight, substantially lower than that produced by the host tissue. The compound from the fungus was authenticated by comparing the LC–HRMS and LC–HRMS/MS spectra with those of the reference standard and that produced by the host plant. Methanolic extract of the fungus was cytotoxic against HCT-116 and MCF-7 human cancer cell lines (IC50 = 10 μg/ml for both cancer cell lines).

Keywords

Dysoxylum binectariferum Endophytic fungus Fusarium proliferatum LC–HRMS/MS Rohitukine Flavopiridol 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by grants from the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India. Collection of samples and other field work was facilitated by the kind permission of the State Forest Department, Government of Karnataka. R. Uma Shaanker and B. T. Ramesha were supported partly by INFU, Technische Universität Dortmund during the preparation of the manuscript. Work was also supported by grants from the International Bureau (IB) of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF/DLR), Germany to M. Spiteller.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patel Mohana Kumara
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sebastian Zuehlke
    • 4
  • Vaidyanathan Priti
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bheemanahally Thimmappa Ramesha
    • 1
    • 2
  • Singh Shweta
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gudasalamani Ravikanth
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ramesh Vasudeva
    • 5
  • Thankayyan Retnabai Santhoshkumar
    • 6
  • Michael Spiteller
    • 4
  • Ramanan Uma Shaanker
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.School of Ecology and ConservationUniversity of Agricultural SciencesBangaloreIndia
  2. 2.Department of Crop PhysiologyUniversity of Agricultural SciencesBangaloreIndia
  3. 3.Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment, Royal EnclaveBangaloreIndia
  4. 4.Institute of Environmental ResearchTechnische Universität DortmundDortmundGermany
  5. 5.Department of Forest Biology and Tree ImprovementCollege of ForestrySirsiIndia
  6. 6.Apoptosis and Cell SignallingRajiv Gandhi Centre for BiotechnologyTrivandrumIndia

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