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Low-power wake-up receiver with subthreshold CMOS circuits for wireless sensor networks

  • Kazuhiro Takahagi
  • Hiromichi Matsushita
  • Tomoki Iida
  • Masayuki Ikebe
  • Yoshihito Amemiya
  • Eiichi Sano
Article

Abstract

We developed a wake-up receiver comprised of subthreshold CMOS circuits. The proposed receiver includes an envelope detector, a high-gain baseband amplifier, a clock and data recovery (CDR) circuit, and a wake-up signal recognition circuit. The drain nonlinearity in the subthreshold region effectively detects the baseband signal with a microwave carrier. The offset cancellation method with a biasing circuit operated by the subthreshold produces a high gain of more than 100 dB for the baseband amplifier. A pulse-width modulation (PWM) CDR drastically reduces the power consumption of the receiver. A 2.4-GHz detector, a high-gain amplifier and a PWM clock recovery circuit were designed and fabricated with 0.18-μm CMOS process with one poly and six metal layers. The fabricated detector and high-gain amplifier achieved a sensitivity of −47.2 dBm while consuming only 6.8 μW from a 1.5 V supply. The fabricated clock recovery circuit operated successfully up to 500 kbps.

Keywords

Wake-up receiver Envelope detector High-gain amplifier Clock and data recovery Subthreshold operation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by SCOPE, by GCOE and by VDEC in collaboration with Cadence Design Systems, Inc., and Agilent Technologies Japan, Ltd.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kazuhiro Takahagi
    • 1
  • Hiromichi Matsushita
    • 2
  • Tomoki Iida
    • 1
  • Masayuki Ikebe
    • 2
  • Yoshihito Amemiya
    • 2
  • Eiichi Sano
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Center for Integrated Quantum ElectronicsHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of Information Science and TechnologyHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan

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