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Psychosocial Factors Associated with Food Insufficiency Among People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) Initiating ART in Ethiopia

  • Madeline A. DiLorenzoEmail author
  • Angela Parcesepe
  • Olga Tymejczyk
  • Susie Hoffman
  • Batya Elul
  • Sheri D. Weiser
  • Robert H. Remien
  • Sarah Gorrell Kulkarni
  • Tsigereda Gadisa
  • Zenebe Melaku
  • Denis Nash
Original Paper
  • 16 Downloads

Abstract

Food insufficiency is associated with suboptimal HIV treatment outcomes. Less is known about psychosocial correlates of food insufficiency among PLWH. This sample includes 1176 adults initiating antiretroviral therapy at HIV clinics in Ethiopia. Logistic regression modeled the association of psychological distress, social support, and HIV-related stigma with food insufficiency. Among respondents, 21.4% reported frequent food insufficiency. Psychological distress [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.61 (95% CI 1.79, 3.82)], low social support [aOR 2.20 (95% CI 1.57, 3.09)] and enacted stigma [aOR 1.69 (95% CI 1.26, 2.25)] were independently associated with food insufficiency. Food insufficiency interventions should address its accompanying psychosocial context.

Keywords

Food insufficiency HIV ART Psychological distress Social support Stigma 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge the study participants and clinic and research staff who collected the data.

Funding

The project was supported by a research grant from the US National Institute of Mental Health (R01MH089831). Dr. Parcesepe was also supported by Award Number T32 MH019139 (Principal Investigator, Theodorus Sandfort, PhD) from the National Institute of Mental Health. All the clinics included in this study received support from ICAP at Columbia University through funding from the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

The study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards of the Oromia Regional Health Bureau, Columbia University Medical Center and the City University of New York. All procedures performed in this study were in accordance with the ethical standards of the Institutional Review Boards of these institutions and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Madeline A. DiLorenzo
    • 1
    Email author
  • Angela Parcesepe
    • 2
  • Olga Tymejczyk
    • 1
    • 3
  • Susie Hoffman
    • 4
    • 5
  • Batya Elul
    • 5
  • Sheri D. Weiser
    • 6
  • Robert H. Remien
    • 4
  • Sarah Gorrell Kulkarni
    • 1
  • Tsigereda Gadisa
    • 7
  • Zenebe Melaku
    • 7
  • Denis Nash
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Implementation Science in Population HealthCity University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Maternal and Child Health, Gillings School of Global Public HealthUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Graduate School of Public Health and Health PolicyCity University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral StudiesColumbia University and New York State Psychiatric InstituteNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Department of EpidemiologyColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Division of HIV, Infectious Diseases and Global Medicine, Department of MedicineUniversity of California San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  7. 7.International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Program (ICAP)Columbia UniversityAddis AbabaEthiopia

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