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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 22, Issue 9, pp 3044–3056 | Cite as

Geographic and Individual Associations with PrEP Stigma: Results from the RADAR Cohort of Diverse Young Men Who have Sex with Men and Transgender Women

  • Brian MustanskiEmail author
  • Daniel T. Ryan
  • Christina Hayford
  • Gregory PhillipsII
  • Michael E. Newcomb
  • Justin D. Smith
Original Paper

Abstract

Increasing the uptake of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV acquisition among at-risk populations, such as young men who have sex with men (YMSM), is of vital importance to slowing the HIV epidemic. Stigma and negative injunctive norms, such as the so called “Truvada Whore” phenomenon, hamper this effort. We examined the prevalence and types of PrEP stigma and injunctive norm beliefs among YMSM and transgender women and associated individual and geospatial factors. A newly created measure of PrEP Stigma and Positive Attitudes was administered to 620 participants in an ongoing longitudinal cohort study. Results indicated lower stigma among White, compared to Black and Latino participants, and among participants not identifying as male. Prior knowledge about PrEP was associated with lower stigma and higher positive attitudes. PrEP stigma had significant geospatial clustering and hotspots were identified in neighborhoods with high HIV incidence and concentration of racial minorities, whereas coldspots were identified in areas with high HIV incidence and low LGBT stigma. These results provide important information about PrEP attitudes and how PrEP stigma differs between individuals and across communities.

Keywords

Pre-exposure prophylaxis Geospatial Homosexuality, male HIV Stigma 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank participants of RADAR. RADAR is funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U01 01DA036939. Third Coast Center for AIDS Research is supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P30 AI117943. The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily reflect the view of the National Institutes of Health.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the Northwestern University Institutional Review Board and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing, Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medical Social SciencesFeinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Third Coast Center for AIDS Research, Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  4. 4.Center for Prevention Implementation Methodology, Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA

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