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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 513–521 | Cite as

Understanding the Targeting and Uptake of HIV Testing Among Gay and Bisexual Men Attending Sexual Health Clinics

  • Muhammad S. Jamil
  • Hamish McManus
  • Denton Callander
  • Garrett Prestage
  • Hammad Ali
  • Catherine C. O’Connor
  • Marcus Chen
  • Anna M. McNulty
  • Vickie Knight
  • Tim Duck
  • Phillip Keen
  • James Gray
  • Nick Medland
  • Margaret Hellard
  • David A. Lewis
  • Andrew E. Grulich
  • John M. Kaldor
  • Christopher K. Fairley
  • Basil Donovan
  • Rebecca J. Guy
  • on behalf of ACCESS and NSW Partnership Project Steering Committees
Original Paper

Abstract

We assessed trends in HIV testing outcomes during a period of clinic-based initiatives introduced to increase HIV testing among gay and bisexual men (GBM) attending sexual health clinics (SHCs) in New South Wales (NSW). A cohort of 25,487 HIV-negative GBM attending 32 SHCs in NSW (2009–2015) was classified into six sub-groups each year based on client-type (new/existing), risk-status (low/high-risk), and any recent HIV testing. Poisson regression methods were used to assess HIV testing outcomes in sub-groups of GBM. HIV testing outcomes and the sub-groups with greatest statistically significant annual increases were: individuals attending (26% in high-risk existing clients with recent testing); testing uptake (4% in low-risk existing clients with no recent testing); testing frequency (6% in low-risk existing clients with no recent testing and 5% in high-risk existing clients with recent testing); and total tests (31% in high-risk existing clients with recent testing). High-risk existing clients with recent testing had a 13% annual increase in the proportional contribution to total tests. Our findings show improved targeting of testing to high-risk GBM at NSW SHCs. The clinic-based initiatives should be considered for translation to other similar settings.

Keywords

MSM Gay men High-risk HIV Testing Sexual health clinics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

ACCESS Steering Committee members who are not co-authors: Lewis Marshall, David Wilson, Bridget Dickson, Marlene Kong, and Lucy Watchirs Smith. NSW Partnership Project Steering Committee members who are not co-authors: David Cooper, Christine Selvey, Jo Holden, Levinia Crooks, Craig Cooper, Karen Price, John de Wit, Anthony Kelleher, Jo Mitchell, Heather-Marie Schmidt, Barbara Telfer, and Bill Whittaker. The ACCESS Project received funding from the health departments of New South Wales, Victoria, Australian Capital Territory, and the North Territory. The analysis was also supported by NSW Partnership Project which received funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council (Partnership Project Grant #1092852), the NSW department of Health, and UNSW Sydney. We acknowledge the contribution of CaraData for their assistance in extracting data and also acknowledge all clinics and clinical staff who provided data for this study.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. For this type of study formal consent is not required.

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Muhammad S. Jamil
    • 1
  • Hamish McManus
    • 1
  • Denton Callander
    • 1
    • 2
  • Garrett Prestage
    • 1
  • Hammad Ali
    • 1
  • Catherine C. O’Connor
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Marcus Chen
    • 5
    • 6
  • Anna M. McNulty
    • 7
    • 8
  • Vickie Knight
    • 1
    • 7
  • Tim Duck
    • 9
  • Phillip Keen
    • 1
  • James Gray
    • 10
  • Nick Medland
    • 5
    • 6
  • Margaret Hellard
    • 11
  • David A. Lewis
    • 12
    • 13
  • Andrew E. Grulich
    • 1
  • John M. Kaldor
    • 1
  • Christopher K. Fairley
    • 5
    • 6
  • Basil Donovan
    • 1
    • 7
  • Rebecca J. Guy
    • 1
  • on behalf of ACCESS and NSW Partnership Project Steering Committees
  1. 1.The Kirby InstituteUNSW SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Centre for Social Research in HealthUNSW SydneySydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Sexual Health Service, Community HealthSydney Local Health DistrictSydneyAustralia
  4. 4.Central Clinical SchoolUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  5. 5.Melbourne Sexual Health CentreMelbourneAustralia
  6. 6.Central Clinical SchoolMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  7. 7.Sydney Sexual Health CentreSydney HospitalSydneyAustralia
  8. 8.School of Public Health and Community MedicineUNSW SydneySydneyAustralia
  9. 9.NSW Ministry of HealthSydneyAustralia
  10. 10.ACONSydneyAustralia
  11. 11.Centre for Population HealthBurnet InstituteMelbourneAustralia
  12. 12.Western Sydney Sexual Health CentreWestern Sydney Local Health DistrictSydneyAustralia
  13. 13.Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases & Biosecurity and Sydney Medical School - WestmeadUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia

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