AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 21, Issue 7, pp 2005–2013 | Cite as

Cannabis Use, Medication Management and Adherence Among Persons Living with HIV

Original Paper

Abstract

Cannabis is used to relieve nausea, trigger weight gain, and reduce pain among adults living with HIV; however, the relationship between its use and medication adherence and management is unclear. Participants (N = 107) were from an ongoing cohort study of community-dwelling HIV+ adults, stratified by cannabis (CB) use: HIV+/CB+ (n = 41) and HIV+/CB− (n = 66). CB+ participants either tested positive in a urine toxicology screen for THC or had a self-reported history of regular and recent use. HIV-status was provided by physician results and/or biomarker assessment. Adherence was measured via the Morisky scale and medication management was assessed via the Medication Management Test-Revised. After adjusting for gender, we found no association between cannabis use group and adherence nor medication management. The amount of cannabis used was also not associated with measures of adherence and management. Preliminary findings suggest that cannabis use may not adversely influence medication adherence/management among adults living with HIV.

Keywords

Cannabis Adherence Medication management HIV 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was approved by Florida International University’s Institutional Review Board and was supported by Grants R01 DA031176 & R01 DA033156 (PI: Gonzalez) from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Funding

This study was funded by R01 DA031176 & R01 DA033156 (PI: Gonzalez) from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denise C. Vidot
    • 1
  • Brenda Lerner
    • 2
  • Raul Gonzalez
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Nursing and Health SciencesUniversity of MiamiCoral GablesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychology, Center for Children and FamiliesFlorida International UniversityMiamiUSA

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