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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 21, Issue 9, pp 2628–2633 | Cite as

Examining the Effects of Transphobic Discrimination and Race on HIV Risk Among Transwomen in San Francisco

  • Sean Arayasirikul
  • Erin C. Wilson
  • Henry F. Raymond
Original Paper

Abstract

Transwomen, in particular transwomen of color (TWOC), are among the most vulnerable populations at risk for HIV. This secondary analysis is organized using a gender minority stress framework to examine the effects of transphobic discrimination and race on HIV risk factors. We describe the sample of 149 HIV- adult transwomen in San Francisco and use binary logistic regression to examine the relationship between levels of transphobic discrimination and TWOC status on binge drinking and condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI), controlling for potential confounders. Those with high levels of transphobic discrimination had 3.59 fold greater odds of engaging in binge drinking compared to those who reported a low level of transphobic discrimination (95% CI 1.284–10.034; P = 0.015). TWOC had nearly threefold greater odds of CRAI compared to white transwomen (95% CI 1.048–8.464; P = 0.040). We discuss implications for gender minority stress research and future interventions for this population.

Keywords

Transgender Transwomen Alcohol use HIV/AIDS LGBT health 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank all participants in the study. This study’s funding source had no role in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the article for publication. SA led the development of the manuscript, conducted the statistical analysis, and conceived the data analysis plan. HRF and ECW contributed to the manuscript development.

Funding

Sean Arayasirikul was supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Graduate Research Training on Alcohol Problems (T32AA007240).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Research involving human participants and/or animals

All study procedures were approved by the IRB at the University of California, San Francisco. We have also included supporting statements before the References section to reaffirm ethical conduct of this research study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Social and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Center for Public Health ResearchSan Francisco Department of Public HealthSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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