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AIDS and Behavior

, Volume 21, Issue 4, pp 1016–1024 | Cite as

Retention, Antiretroviral Therapy Use and Viral Suppression by History of Injection Drug Use Among HIV-Infected Patients in an Urban HIV Clinical Cohort

  • Catherine R. LeskoEmail author
  • Weiqun Tong
  • Richard D. Moore
  • Bryan Lau
Original Paper

Abstract

Compared to HIV-infected persons who do not inject drugs (non-IDU), persons who inject drugs (PWID) experience disparities in linking to medical care, initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) and achieving viral suppression. There has been little attention to changes in these disparities over time. We estimated the proportion of PWID and non-IDU retained in care, on ART, and virally suppressed each year from 2001–2012 in the Johns Hopkins HIV Clinical Cohort (JHHCC). We defined active clinic patients as those who had ≥1 clinical visit, CD4 cell count, or viral load between July 1 of the prior year, and June 30 of the analysis year. Within a calendar year, retention was defined as ≥2 clinical visits or HIV-related laboratory measurements >90 days; ART use was defined as ≥1 ART prescription active ≥30 days; and viral suppression was defined as ≥1 HIV viral load <400 copies/mL. While PWID were less likely to be retained in earlier years, the gaps in retention closed around 2010. After 2003–2004, PWID and non-IDU retained in care had similar probability of receiving a prescription for ART and PWID and non-IDU on ART had similar probability of viral suppression.

Keywords

Antiretroviral therapy HIV care continuum Injection drug use Viral load suppression 

Notes

Funding

This work was supported by NIH Grants U01 DA036935 and P30 AI094189.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

CRL has received a speaker honorarium from Gilead Sciences, Inc. for work unrelated to this manuscript. No other authors have conflicts of interest to report.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individuals included in this study.

Supplementary material

10461_2016_1585_MOESM1_ESM.docx (26 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 26 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine R. Lesko
    • 1
    Email author
  • Weiqun Tong
    • 1
  • Richard D. Moore
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bryan Lau
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.School of MedicineJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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